Artist Spotlight: Sonic Graffiti

Today is special! I recently received an email from St. Pete three-piece Sonic Graffiti, who thought I might like there stuff. Before I start, let me say thank you to everyone who has been supportive of The Vinyl Warhol so far. It is already doing better than I ever hoped, and I love hearing/reviewing new music from talented musicians. Enough with the emotional intro, I give you Sonic Graffiti. Enjoy.

If you make music, send it to me!

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Friendly Unit Creation Kit

Sonic Graffiti’s music can be described as neo-Zeppelin, barn burning rock n’ roll. Their debut EP, Friendly Unit Creation Kit, was released on June 1, is a gritty collage of rock, punk, rockabilly, and blues. This EP starts off right. “The Morning Electric” is the quintessential Sonic Graffiti song. It describes Sonic Graffiti, at there core, better than I ever could. Their loud, unapologetic, and you better get out of their way. Guitar licks that dance the fine line between  garage blues and heavy metal, and the bass doesn’t stop for a second, the groove alone will give you carpel tunnel. Drew (vocals/guitar) keeps it simple, no chorus here, just a group chant, that reminds me of Japandroids, and a pair of verses. Drew’s voice is reminiscent Rob Tyner of the MC5. On “Head in the Clouds” he shines as a vocalist, the delivery is convincing and the melody sticks.

Sonic Graffiti delivers riff-rock like old pros, but what’s good here is it never feels stale. They’re more aggressive than the bands their sound comes from, which can be highlighted in the sporadic guitar solos. Their long and numerous, but don’t feel at all forced. “Scribbles” is the wildest of all the tracks on Friendly Unit Creation Kit. The vocals are volatile, so much that the outro is cloaked in gristle of a voice about to break. I’ve never seen Sonic Graffiti live, but I’ll be damned if these songs don’t sound better in person.

The fifth track is a surprise. The guitars, drums, and bass are gone. They’re replaced with what I think is mandolin, because their Facebook says Drew plays mandolin, but to me it sounds like ukulele. There’s nothing wrong with a band putting in a slow song. But to go right from “Scribbles” into this, is too much of a change. I prefer garage rock bands to go more of the psychedelic route with their slower songs. Evan an acoustic guitar with a rolling beat would have fit better on Friendly Unit Creation Kit. I can appreciate the risk, but the mandolin/ukulele thing just contrasts too much the vocals.

Like Sonic Graffiti on Facebook.

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Artist Spotlight: Deap Vally

Like the Black Keys, but with Bigger Balls

Today I’m introducing a new part of The Vinyl Warhol, my Artist Spotlight. Here’s the breakdown, when I come upon a new artist, from the Orlando area, or that I just think rule, I’m going to let you all know about them. Because, for me at least, finding a new band dive into makes any day ten times better. I want you guys to get in on it too! If you are in a band or find a band you think I should spotlight, send me an email, tweet them to me, or just post a comment. Like I said, I love finding new music, any and all genres apply. 

Deap Vally

Deap Vally are an all-girl, two-piece blues rock band, from Los Angeles. And let me start by saying these two kick some major ass! “Oh, they’re good for girls!” NO! They are more filthy, and can probably out drink, 90% of the boy bands who call themselves rock stars. Fortunately for all of you, Deap Vally’s debut album Sistronix, comes out on October 8, so now is the perfect time to get into them.

The best way to describe Deap Vally, is dirty. Lindsey Troy’s vocals remind me of ACDC’s Brian Johnson, but with more flavor. Drummer Julie Edwards, says she was heavily influenced by Meg White, of The White Stripes. Aggression-wise I can agree. But, Edwards is a much more technical drummer, not knocking Meg, but simplicity was her thing. In songs like “Gonna Make My Own Money” she comes pounding in, that would scare most male-drummers. 

Deap Vally’s music speaks for itself. Just listen, and let me know what you think, is there a band that you think is better than Deap Vally that I should know about? Then speak up. Because it’s “The End of the World”, and I’m going out with Deap Vally.

 Listen to Deap Vally on Spotify! 

Check out Rock It Out! Blog’s interview with Deap Vally.