GRANDMA PARTY 2014 LIVE: Fast Preacher

Holy Shit! That raffle was crazy. We’re on to the next one, and that next one is funky three-piece, Fast Preacher. If you’re down to groove, get down with these boys. Just do you baby!

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FREE SAMPLES: Saturday @ Will’s Pub, Girls on the Beach, The Lovers Key, The Young Psychedelics, & The Suit Swingers

Go ahead, have a taste. It’s free to sample, but if you want the real thing, you’re going to have to shell out a few bucks, and believe me, it will definitely be worth it. Enjoy.

HOLY SHIT! This show is only $5.

Girls on the Beach

If I remember correctly, Girls on the Beach played the first show I caught after moving to Orlando. Fingers crossed that we’ll get to hear some new music from them on Saturday.

Catch up with Girls on the Beach at their Bandcamp!

The Lovers Key

This one’s personal. While working at Noisy Ghost, I had the privilege of pushing The Lovers Key’s debut single “Bright Eyes, Black Soul,” and I was instantly floored by their neo-soul sound. Warning: I fully plan on dancing my heart out. Feel free to join me. No shame.

Hear more on the Noisy Ghost PR Soundloud.

The Young Psychedelics

Oh, how embarrassing. For some reason, Reverb Nation won’t let me embed one of The Young Psychedelics‘ songs, but you can listen to their Daydreamer EP here. Fuck Reverb Nation.

The Suit Swingers

Starting the night with some blues rock, The Suit Swingers are a fairly new Orlando outfit that are itching the prove themselves.

Hear The Suit Swingers’ demo on Bandcamp.

Album Review: Jack White – “Lazaretto”

So I was hoping to have this up before Bonnaroo, but that obviously didn’t happen. I however, did get to see Jack at Bonnaroo, and it did kick ass. He played material spanning his entire career, including quite a few cuts from his second solo album, Lazaretto. Here are some words about that album. Enjoy.

“his most angst-ridden album to date.”

Jack White III has typically been a man of mystery. Throughout his career, he has avoided reporters, refused to discuss his work, and at one time, avoided drama by claimed that him and ex-wife Meg White were siblings. Recently however, the garage god has given the press a field day. In 2013, Karen Elson, White’s second ex-wife, filed a restraining order against him, one that was eventually called off. Later that same year, emails surfaced where White voiced grievances towards The Black Keys, claiming that they had “ripped off” his sound. He even refused to let his son attend the same school where Black Key’s frontman Dan Auerbach’s son was enrolled.

This year has been no better for White. Just last month in an interview with Rolling Stone, White proceeded to air his complaints towards Auerbach, Adele, Lana Del Ray, technology, and even Meg White. Since then, he has had to retract his statements and apologize.


This turmoil spills out over Lazaretto. It’s possible that White, at the age of 38, has made his most angst-ridden album to date.  In “I Think I Found The Culprit,” he plays the victim, misappropriated and wrongfully blamed. “I think I found the culprit. It looks like you, must be you.” White’s inflection sounds bitter and scornful. “Alone In My Home” is White in his usual recluse state, hiding from the world, where he can’t be persecuted. It’s one of his finest country ballads to date. The descending vocal melody during the verses (see: “through my door,”) is phenomenally addicting.

But Lazaretto isn’t all guarding. In “Entitlement” and “That Black Bat Licorice,” White shakes his fists at collective humanity, declaring in “That Black Bat Licorice,” “Don’t you want to lose the part of the brain that has opinions? To not even know what you are doing, or care about yourself or your species in the billions.” Not since “Icky Thump” has he vocally attacked the human condition with such force.


The music on Lazaretto is just as aggressive. The bass and organ on “Would You Fight For My Love” are as menacing as the vocals. “High Ball Stepper” doesn’t even need vocals. The violin, reversed piano, and banshee guitars rip through ear drums like they’re toilet paper. Refrains on “Three Women” and “Lazaretto” bring the songs back with a vengeance. Just when you thought White’s onslaught was over, he comes back with cheap shot to jaw just for good measure.

Overall, I thought Lazaretto is leaps better than Blunderbuss. White is aggressive and refuses to pull punches, both lyrically and instrumentally. Like on the album cover, White sits in his throne of rock, alone, not even looking in the direction of his audience. In the future, I’d like to see White pull something out of left field, release an album that takes everyone by surprise. But until then, his usual blues rock bliss leaves me satisfied.

1/20/14 Bag of Tracks: The Dead Weather, Chris Topher, U2

Good day all. I trust everyone’s MLK Day is going swell. I had a great weekend, even though I worked most of it. I saw the movie Her on Friday, and it was incredible. Now that we’re getting closer to Oscar night, I’ve been watching more and more movies. But, Her is by far my favorite of this award season. Everyone should go see it. I also made a trip over to the Dali Museum in St. Petersburg for the opening of their Andy Warhol exhibit. I was absolutely floored. If you live in Florida try to make it over there before it closes in April. Two of the greatest artists of the 20th century are brought together to showcase some breathtaking art.

On to today’s blog! It’s been a while sense we’ve had “A Bag of Tracks,” and we’ve got some good ones for you. Enjoy.

The Dead Weather – “Open Up (That’s Enough)”

The Dead Weather come screaming back with “Open Up (That’s Enough),” their first new material since 2010’s Sea of Cowards. This track is the most furious Dead Weather song since “Treat Me Like Your Mother”. Allison Mosshart takes the reins on vocal duties, with Jack, Little Jack, and Dean singing backup. During the chorus the three men struggle to contain Mosshart, warning her, “That’s enough, that’s enough.” But, she keeps pushing forward into a flurry of rock. The group have plans to release a full-length in 2015, and will be putting out several singles from the album this year. You can listen to “Rough Detective,” the second song released, on Spotify.

Chris Topher – “Creators & Innovators”

For those who don’t remember, I reviewed Chris’ EP Introspective a few months back and was blown away by the sonic bliss. Shortly after I reviewed the EP, I talked to Chris about how much I loved his music and what he planned to do with it in the future. He initially said that Introspective was going to be his last release, but after how well it was received, he was inspired to continue creating. That brings us to “Creators & Innovators”. The microphone crackles as Chris begins with a warped synth line. Like the rest of his music, I’m instantly transported to another world. I get lost in the continuous drum beat that is both big and beautiful. The whole song is intergalactic in size and feel. As the music closes, an old radio sample, which has become a staple for Chris, follows us out with a thought provoking monologue. Goosebumps.

U2 – “Pride (In The Name Of Love)”

Obviously, this song was written back in the 80’s, but today it has extra meaning. For those who are unaware, this song is about Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. I think “Pride (In The Name Of Love)” captures the humble preacher’s character perfectly. His struggle. His persistence. His message. As Bono so beautifully puts it, “Free at last, they took your life. They could not take your pride.” Even if you hate U2, I hope today you can feel something marvelous. Have a wonderful day.

Live Music: “Don’t Wake the Neighbors” EP Release Show featuring: Ricin House, yogurt smoothness, The Dull Blades, & The Vivid

Friday night was a great night for music. The Vivid celebrated the release of their first EP Don’t Wake the Neighbors with a star-studded show at Uncle Lou’s. The lineup consisted of Ricin House, yogurt smoothness, The Dull Blades, and The Vivid, all playing their own brand of garage rock. I’ve seen each band at least a half a dozen times, and consider them all to be some of Orlando’s best talent. Here is at testament of what went down on that crazy hazy night. Enjoy.

Follow The Vinyl Warhol on Facebook and Twitter for more music updates.

Ricin House

Ricin House is a three piece punk DIY kind of band. Uncle Lou’s is home for Ricin House. They’ve been playing there for years, and the play-on-the-floor dive bar aesthetic works in Ricin’s favor. Seeing them play again at Lou’s reminds me of the time Iain smashed his guitar mid-set and ran out the door, in what could be the most rock n’ roll moment of my life. On stage, or rather on floor, Ricin House sounded better than ever, and the chemistry between band members is clear. Mercy plays the drums with more ferocity than anyone I’ve ever seen. She beats the holy hell out of her kit every time I see Ricin, and every wallop is technical and precise. Bassist Brian is similar. Together they build a tight rhythm section for Iain to go batshit all over. Iain’s guitar is unpredictable and wild. But, his voice is soulful, yet gritty, which made songs like “Simon” pop.

Find out more about Ricin House.

yogurt smoothness

What is there to say about yogurt smoothness that hasn’t already been said? Coming off their “Heavy Cream 2013 Tour,” these boys are still hungry for more tasty jams, and they proved that at Lou’s. Danilo said early in the set that they’re tired of playing their new songs, and because Orlando is where they cut their teeth, their old music was warmly welcomed.  During their set, I overheard The Vivid’s Brandon Kasper saying, “They sound different every time,” and that’s what yogurt smoothness do. They come out. Do their thing. And blow your mind with something new. EVERY TIME. Friday was no different.

Read my world renowned article: Hometown Heroes: Yogurt Smoothness

Find out more about yogurt smoothness.

The Dull Blades

If I were to summarize my freshman of college in one album, it would be The Dull Blades’ Less Production More Seduction. That year I probably saw The Dull Blades at least eight times. Friday however, had been over a year since I had seen the two-some of Nik Talbot and Anthony Fata blow my fucking doors off with blues rock wonderment. They came rushing back with a set of new songs from their upcoming second album (rumor has it that it’s titled Indullgence, but I didn’t say shit about that). On floor, Nik and Anthony are wonder twins of rock, with grooves so sweet you can’t help but dance. Nik’s guitar playing and voice make the ladies, and some men, swoon. Along with Anthony’s experience and power, The Dull Blades sound like a more interesting version of The Black Keys.

Find out more about The Dull Blades.

The Vivid

It’s their show, and they’ll rock if they want to. The Vivid closed out the night with some experimental garage punk. With the release of their first EP Don’t Wake the Neighbors, (review pending) The Vivid were on a high at the show. Their opener was “Riser,” the first single from DWTN. The song is a perfect description of the band, starting off with a reverb doused extended intro of shoegaze bliss, then coming down with a heavy riff, before settling into the chorus’ groove. As their set progressed, The Vivid played DWTN in its entirety, showcasing their different musical styles. I’ll talk more about DWTN in my full review, so stay tuned for that. Having been at almost every show The Vivid has played, I’ve seen them grow as a band. The harmonies between Cory Young and Brandon Kasper were tighter than ever, and with an ever-expanding arsenal of songs, the future for The Vivid looks very bright.

Find out more about The Vivid.

Artist Spotlight: Sonic Graffiti

Today is special! I recently received an email from St. Pete three-piece Sonic Graffiti, who thought I might like there stuff. Before I start, let me say thank you to everyone who has been supportive of The Vinyl Warhol so far. It is already doing better than I ever hoped, and I love hearing/reviewing new music from talented musicians. Enough with the emotional intro, I give you Sonic Graffiti. Enjoy.

If you make music, send it to me!

Follow The Vinyl Warhol on Facebook and Twitter for more music updates.

Friendly Unit Creation Kit

Sonic Graffiti’s music can be described as neo-Zeppelin, barn burning rock n’ roll. Their debut EP, Friendly Unit Creation Kit, was released on June 1, is a gritty collage of rock, punk, rockabilly, and blues. This EP starts off right. “The Morning Electric” is the quintessential Sonic Graffiti song. It describes Sonic Graffiti, at there core, better than I ever could. Their loud, unapologetic, and you better get out of their way. Guitar licks that dance the fine line between  garage blues and heavy metal, and the bass doesn’t stop for a second, the groove alone will give you carpel tunnel. Drew (vocals/guitar) keeps it simple, no chorus here, just a group chant, that reminds me of Japandroids, and a pair of verses. Drew’s voice is reminiscent Rob Tyner of the MC5. On “Head in the Clouds” he shines as a vocalist, the delivery is convincing and the melody sticks.

Sonic Graffiti delivers riff-rock like old pros, but what’s good here is it never feels stale. They’re more aggressive than the bands their sound comes from, which can be highlighted in the sporadic guitar solos. Their long and numerous, but don’t feel at all forced. “Scribbles” is the wildest of all the tracks on Friendly Unit Creation Kit. The vocals are volatile, so much that the outro is cloaked in gristle of a voice about to break. I’ve never seen Sonic Graffiti live, but I’ll be damned if these songs don’t sound better in person.

The fifth track is a surprise. The guitars, drums, and bass are gone. They’re replaced with what I think is mandolin, because their Facebook says Drew plays mandolin, but to me it sounds like ukulele. There’s nothing wrong with a band putting in a slow song. But to go right from “Scribbles” into this, is too much of a change. I prefer garage rock bands to go more of the psychedelic route with their slower songs. Evan an acoustic guitar with a rolling beat would have fit better on Friendly Unit Creation Kit. I can appreciate the risk, but the mandolin/ukulele thing just contrasts too much the vocals.

Like Sonic Graffiti on Facebook.

Low Dough Mondays: Butter Queen, The Woolly Bushmen, Alias Punch

There are two things in this universe that can always brighten up my day: live music and a leather jacket. It’s not cold enough yet for a leather jacket, and this blog isn’t really geared towards leather goods, so today I’m talking about some live music. Last night, at the infamous Will’s Pub, Butter Queen, The Woolly Bushmen, and Alias Punch kept it smooth, and made us move. It was Low Dough Monday, so I got all this goodness for $3, so don’t miss the next one. Enjoy.

Follow The Vinyl Warhol on Facebook and Twitter for more music updates.

Butter Queen

First on, crawling straight out of the gutter, was Butter Queen. Butter Queen is the supergroup of the Orlando music scene. Composed of one part Wet Nurse, one part Basements of Florida, and one part Tam Tam the Sandwich Man, this Frankenstein’s Monster came out swinging. Although a fairly new act, their experience shows. Vocal duties change between salty and sweet, but their sound is all sleaze. One song was even dedicated to longtime local dive bar, Wally’s. I look forward to hearing more from Butter Queen, and seeing some of my favorite local bands come together was magic.

The Woolly Bushmen

The Woolly Bushmen are in a league all their own. I’ve seen them a few times, and they never fail to get the whole crowd moving. Get your rockabilly gear out because you will be swing dancing, you will be amazed, you will not survive. Simon Palombi (vocals/guitar/keyboards) has a presence on stage that is somewhere between Jack White and a stumbling drunk. Throughout the set he stomped around on stage like a caveman. Julian Palombi (drums) beat the hell out of his drum set, and the banter between the brothers turned this set into a show. If you haven’t seen The Woolly Bushmen live, do yourself a favor and fix that. They have another show at Will’s again on November 9, don’t miss it!

Alias Punch

Alias Punch closed out the night, and they did so in a big way. Off what sounds like an exhausting tour, the band still seemed fresh, and played with a sound all their own. Self described as, ” a sludgy blanket to keep you warm through the winters, and cool in the summers,” this band is really hard to pinpoint. They’re experimental rock, with killer riffs, a FUCK IT attitude, and enough beer to put down a football team. Screaming vocals, talking vocals, chanting vocals, melodic guitars, crunching guitars, these songs stay fresh. But, one things remains the same. They kick your ass all over the room.