Why Is The Space Important?

On any given night, 1206 E. Colonial Dr. is a prime location to witness Orlando’s growing cultural impact. This artistic mecca is home to a variety of celebrations and group expression; punk shows, acoustic nights, yoga classes, poetry readings, and late-night ragers have all found a place in its continuously open door. The paradise I’m referring to is Orlando’s most cherished DIY venue, The Space. Since its inception, The Space has provided an outlet where anyone living in, or simply passing through, the Orlando community can hold a public or private event for a flexible, donation-based rental rate.

The idea of a place for us to teach in, to rehearse and play in that is kept afloat based on the efforts of the community is such a next-level, foreign concept for us. Maybe this is our chance to evolve as a unit and directly support each other’s passions and art forms.

– Addison Muha (Fiery Guitarist, Singer-Songwriter) 

But, providing such a platform isn’t cheap. The Space continuously struggles to make rent and relies on the surrounding community to keep it afloat. This Saturday, Space Fest 2, a fundraising event featuring music, art, and tarot card readings, will raise money to help keep this dream a reality. Admission is $10, and every cent is going directly to The Space. In preparation for the event, I asked some of Saturday’s performers to give me their thoughts on one question: “Why is The Space important?” In my opinion, if we let The Space die, we are closer letting the Orlando music and art community fade away as well. Don’t let Mickey Mouse win. Enjoy.

I live in a city where we lost all of our venues that allow smaller, local bands to play, and because of that, our music scene has basically died out. Of course that would never happen to Orlando, but you guys can’t let the venues with such a good reputation as The Space die out. We all know how sad it was to see The Peacock Room go.

– Russell Nylen (Tiger Fawn Avant-Percussionist)

Visit thespaceistheplace.com for upcoming events!

The Space is great asset to local music, as it enables and encourages community more than a regular venue would. It feels like our thing and a lot of people take pride in it.

– Dromes (Electro-pop Guru)

There is no other way to describe the importance of The Space other than using the word HOME. Home is wherever you can be you. Home is where you create your greatest memories with the greatest people you can encounter. Home doesn’t have to have the best of anything, as long as you make the best out of everything. The Space gives people a home who don’t have one. If you need a place to be free, and be yourself, The Space is the place to be.

TKO (O-town Hip Hop Heavyweight) 

DIY venues give local communities the ability to express their own unique brand/culture of weird; The Space embraces that mentality. But with that freedom comes the responsibility of preserving both the credibility and the physical condition of that place … Having something like The Space is a privilege, not a right. If it is treated as such, then we believe Orlando can further cultivate a community of creativity that will blow minds.

– Dani Lacerda (Tiger Fawn Vocalist) 

[The Space] is a direct reflection of the community. How it’s doing, how it’s run, the shows that happen there, are all representative of how the music community (to be honest, how the entire artistic community) as a whole is doing … If The Space needs help, that’s a reflection of the music community.

ARK (Multimedia Artist and Multi-Instrumentalist) 

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Killer Mike Delivers Impassioned Speech after the Micheal Brown Verdict

This is heart-breaking. It’s incredibly powerful and incredibly brave, but it’s heart-breaking.

“Riots are only the language of the unheard.” 

Happy 200th post.

A transcription of the speech that I ripped from Consequence of Sound:

I would like to say Rest in Peace to Michael Brown. I would like to give all thoughts and prayers to the people out there peacefully protesting. I also give thoughts and prayers to the people who could not hold their anger in because riots are only the language of the unhold. We usually come on to Queen’s ‘Champion’, but I just got to tell you today, no matter how much we do it, no matter how much we get shit together, shit comes along and kicks you on your ass. Tonight, I got kicked on my ass when I heard that prosecutor. You motherfuckers got me today, I knew it was coming when Eric Holder decided to resign. You motherfuckers got me today. You kicked me on my ass today, because I have a 20-year-old son and a 12-year-old son, and I’m so afraid for them today.

When I stood on the bus, and I cried, and I hugged my friend, I said, ‘these motherfuckers got me today.’ When I stood in front of my wife, and I cried like a baby, I said, ‘these motherfuckers got me today. You motherfuckers will not own tomorrow, we will not bend to your fear, we will not accept your pain, we are not going to keep playing that race card, because we know you don’t value my skin. We know you do value his (El-P), but we’re friends and nothing is going to devalue that.

There was no peace in my heart and I wanted to walk out to ‘Burn This Motherfucker Down’. But I got to tell you, I’m from Atlanta, Georgia, something said, ‘Just look for something [Martin Luther King Jr.] might have said,’ so I googled Martin King and Wikipedia popped up, and he was 39 years old when you motherfuckers killed him. He was the same age as I am, the same age as [El-P]. He was a young man when you killed him.

But I can promise you today: If I die when I walk off this stage tomorrow, I’ll let you know this: it is not about race, it is not a class, it’s not about color, it’s about what they killed him for. It’s about poverty, it’s about greed, and it’s about a war machine. It’s about a war machine that uses you. So as I go tomorrow, I might go the day after, the one thing I want you to know is that it’s us against the motherfucking machine!”

POP POV: Iggy Pop VS Edward Hopper

This idea has long been in the works; two pieces of art – one song, one painting – compared in theme, feeling, style, etc. Studying art is a huge passion of mine, and so often a piece of music and a painting speak to me in similar ways. Even our name “The Vinyl Warhol” came about as a combination of love for music and art history.

For my inaugural juxtaposition, I’ve selected Iggy Pop’s “The Passenger,” a brilliant cut off his 1977 solo album Lust for Life, and American realist Edward Hopper’s 1942 masterpiece, NighthawksEnjoy.

I have always enjoyed the city. Even in such an immense crossing of commuters, there is always a certain singular personality to its madness, thousands – maybe millions – of distinct lives, all unaccompanied in a sea of swirling energy. This theme flows throughout both pieces, playing off of that isolated soul.

In “The Passenger,” that soul travels – presumably by bus – through the city, viewing its “ripped backside” as if looking through a television screen. Pop narrates this transit in a low gristle. His cadence creates tone. We see the passing glow of streetlamps, the distinct urban aura. It’s cold. The sky is hollow.

nighthawks

As we coast through the sleeping city in “The Passenger,” our transporter passes by a dinner. Inside, the characters of Edward Hopper’s Nighthawks sit behind similar glass. This snapshot scene – the viewer peaking into this solemn metropolitan life – mirrors Pop’s croons. Hopper often captured city-goers in his work, but rarely were any of his subjects interacting with each other. The separation created between these mannequin-like forms is haunting. They sit under a bright artificial light, stark against the building’s green colors.

Although the big city brings promise of bustling nightlife, it too is the place where we can feel most alone. Pop and Hopper both knew this, and they each shared their own isolated experiences in two remarkable pieces of work.

POP POV: Pulling a Beyoncé (Part ‘U’2)

The following are thoughts continuing from a previous article, Pulling a Beyoncé: Why are artists releasing ‘surprise’ albums?” I recommend reading that post before viewing part two, but who the hell am I tell you what to do? Enjoy.

Ladies and gentlemen, we have been invaded. On September 9, a 54-year-old man who refers to himself as Bono sneaked into computer and left something. Bono, along with his cohorts (a 53-year-old man who answers to the name The Edge, a bass player named Adam, and a drummer named Larry), left a steaming pile of Innocence, stamped with a familiar Apple, on every Itunes user’s doorstep. The practical joke in question revolves around the intrusion of U2’s Songs of Innocence in the library of anyone with an Itunes account. U2 released the “surprise” album in conjunction with Apple’s unveiling of the Iphone 6 and Apple Watch. If you’d like to, you can read more up on partnership here.

u2

Writer’s Note: I understand there are endless blog posts and Internet comments bashing U2. Personally, I have never shared that hateful sentiment; there are many U2 songs I enjoy, and I think they’ve made some very important albums. Go listen to Pop, a commercial failure largely due to the addition of electronica and dance elements, but an album that by today’s standards was completely ahead of its time. This is just one often overlooked landmark in the band’s catalog.

Okay, back to reality. Now, I haven’t listened to Songs of Innocence, so I can’t accurately judge whether or not the music is comparable to dog excrement. But many of the reactions I’ve seen to album’s unexpected, or should I say “surprise,” presence has been less then welcoming, a reception completely opposite from Beyoncé’s “surprise” release. Here are my two possible explanations as to why.

The first is a bit obvious. U2’s “surprise” album was not offered as a gift; it was placed without our notice on our phones and in our computers. Additionally, you may not delete the album. This unwanted placement makes Songs of Innocence another Apple IOS update that everyone hates. It’s like if someone were to come over to your house, and just left something in your bathroom for you to see every time you shit. It’s what I imagine anyone in a popular band feels when someone hands them a demo, “Here’s some free music.” *wink*. It’s obtrusive because you weren’t given a choice.

u2z

Point two. As I mentioned in the former article, music fans adore surprise releases because they feel special. You imagine that the artist had just finished the album and couldn’t wait share it with you. Logic would say the artist stands to lose money with no prior campaign, but money seems like a lesser thought. It feels genuine.

But Songs of Innocence is the complete opposite of that. Apple paid U2 an ungodly, but disclosed, amount of money for the right to releaseThe marketing budget alone was over $100 million! For decades, U2 have been the epitome of corporate rock, and now they’ve chosen to team with the poster child for big business. Therefore, the release of Songs of Innocence comes across as nothing but pandering. From this point on, any semi-popular artist who releases a surprise album will appear a little more calculated, a little phonier. And that’s all I have to say about that.

“I can’t live with or without you.” 

POP POV: ‘KISS’ing Rock Goodbye

“The death of rock was not a natural death. Rock did not die of old age. It was murdered.”

Recently, KISS bassist and washed-up rock capitalist Gene Simmons spoke with Esquire on a variety of industry-related topics, most of which he wasn’t qualified to speak on. During The Demon’s ramblings, he muttered the quote above and declared rock music as, “finally dead.” Simmons proceeded to condemn file-sharing – oooo, shocker, he’s upset about money – as the cold-blooded killer, and painted a 15-year-old boy on his computer as the reason for the decline in the music industry.

gene
Now, although I think anyone who actively listens to modern music would know that the genre is far from dead – artists like Arcade Fire, Tame Impala, Radiohead, Jack White, and Ty Segall are doing just fine – Simmons does bring up an important point. In the past decade, rock music has sharply declined in commercial popularity, losing the smash singles and huge, multi-platinum record sales of the 70’s, 80’s and 90’s. Few FM radio stations play rock music, and ones that do play a genre best described as “butt rock” mixed in with same tired Nirvana singles.

But, my concern isn’t about the lack of rock songs in the Billboard Top 40 or the decline in record sales, because true rock n’ roll has never been about that. My worries stem from the direction I see rock music facing: backwards.

Today, countless bands play music that could be ripped right out of the late-60’s, mid-70’s, or the late-80’s. I’m not branding this music as not good, I’m a huge fan artists like White and Segall, but repeating the past ad nauseam isn’t breaking any new ground. Art needs to continue to move forward or it’s destined to fade away, and condemning new technology and all electronically-based music isn’t smart, because like it or not, it is the future.

My-Bloody-Valentine
Now, I don’t think rock n’ roll has to embrace this new, trendy music with open arms, or even acknowledge it. Look at Imagine Dragons. Is this what you want? Because I sure don’t. But I do know that the genre needs to stop living solely in the past, and start experimenting with new instruments, sounds, and song structures. This is already being done with bands like My Bloody Valentine, Tame Impala, St. Vincent, and Swans. Artists who are aware of their music’s rich history, but aren’t afraid to twist and shape it into something radically different.

And, I say all this because I would hate to see a world where rock n’ roll is no longer relevant. Currently, rock is fighting a battle its set to lose, because ultimately, the music that strives forward, creates innovative sound, and helps define its own generation, is destined to win.