Good Graeff Good Job Go ep review

Good Graeff – ‘Good Job Go’ (ep review)

Good Job Go has me feelin’ some type of way. Once the EP had played through for the 6th or 7th time, I had to stop and inquire: when was the last time I heard something that simply put a smile on my face? When was the last time music made me experience unadulterated glee, for nothing but pure enjoyment.

Good Graeff masterfully crafted this release to keep anyone who hears it in absolute bliss. Bringing you back to that full moon on the beach, you feel the midsummer breeze blow back your hair as you take in the sparkling peaks of the Atlantic. Or maybe, it was the trip up to St. Auggie with the entire band in one car; the windows were down and the Florida sun illuminated every beautiful detail.

I digress. Let’s talk about those vocal runs, and how they ran away with my heart. I found myself treated to quick, precise melodies that maintain the thought and emotion of a talented artist, gracefully placed over dreamy cello and poppy bass.

Another delicious treat was lying just under the warm, fuzzy blanket the aforementioned melodies had knit: a floating cello. The instrument’s incorporation suggests a majestic melancholy over an otherwise upbeat album. This is most apparent on the final track on the album, “Unsung Heroes.” Unlike the former songs, this track abandons the rest of the album’s upbeat attitude, laying me to rest beside the sleepy cello.

You know what…
It’s time to press play again.

Good Graeff – ‘Good Job Go’ (ep review) by Graham Johnson

SALES - "big sis"

SALES – “big sis”

I’m sitting outside with my laptop and a clementine peel. It’s raining, but not pouring. The precipitation is falling perfectly parallel to earth. The droplets are thin, misting the grass. It’s Sunday. I’m listening to the new SALES song, “big sis.” The electric guitar is as gentle as the rain. It creates a warm backdrop for singer Lauren Morgan, whose voice is so comforting, you’d think she was consoling you personally. Even when the rain picks up, I remain at unscathed.

I saw SALES a few weeks back at Uncle Lou’s. The place had never been so packed; people were practically spilling out the front door. At one point, a gang of confused motorcycle-riding neanderthals wondered in, pushing their way through the crowd. The largest member of the collective, who didn’t feel the need to prove himself by shoving small indie kids, stood at the back, gently swaying to the downtempo lulls that had engrossed him. That night, much like today, SALES calmed the storm — even though it was wearing a leather vest. Enjoy.

SALES – “Renee” (Tiny Desk Submission)

Orlando duo SALES have yet to perform on NPR’s Tiny Desk series, but looking at their submission video, NPR is missing out. Lauren Morgan’s vocals fit oh so perfectly with the intimate ambience of the video’s mood; it’s easy to lose yourself in this two-some’s cozy sounds. Enjoy.

Hear SALES’ latest EP at their Bandcamp.

 

Bellows: Linear Abstraction & Christmas Sweaters

Editor’s Note: Since this interview, the members of Bellows changed their name to Someday River

This year, no one is more overcome with holiday spirit than Orlando experimental folk rock trio, Bellows. These sonic sculptors have been at it since 2010; and in 2013, Orlando Weekly named them Best Experimental Act. I sat down with Bellows’ lead architect Greyson Charnock to talk about Orlando music, Bellows’ progression, and Christmas cheer. Later, I was able to encroach on the band’s practice space with TVW Photographer, Karina Curto. Somehow, we ended up helping them out with their Christmas cards. Enjoy.

This Saturday, Bellows’ will be playing at Sweater Fest. Come see Orlando’s finest take over The Milk District.

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M: Within the band, do you do most of the songwriting? How does that work?

G: Some of [Bellows’] earlier material was stuff that I had written that we just pieced together and turned into this structural thing. But we’re moving more into like, I might just come up with a little idea and we all just jam on it together. Then we say, “that works, this doesn’t work.” [We] sort of separate it out into a song that’s more grooved-based. Instead of [songs] based solely on transitions, or solely on the vocals, which is something I did a lot in the past.

M: That’s what collaboration does, right?

G: Yeah. We got Sean [Boyle] on drums, and Pat [Dunn] on the bass. And they’ve really helped crystallize the band. We were a two-piece for a while, and I think there’s a lot of being deliberate as a two piece. The idea is so pure. But, now that we have a bassist, I could never go back.

M: You guys have been [playing] for like, five years… almost five?

G: Yeah, five years from our first show is in February.

M: Five years is a long time, especially for a local band.

G: I didn’t have any expectations, honestly. When I first started writing music [after] I moved to college; it took me years to grasp the idea that, “Okay, there’s a next step to this.” Before that, I had no intentions of ever playing for anybody. Even open mics, I never did [those] until Bellows. That was the first time that I ever played live.

M: Really? How did it go?

G: (laughs) It went alright. It takes a long time to get your footing in a community… now it sort of feels like I can just feel the culture building, and it’s kind of cool to be a part of it.

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M: You guys are playing sweater fest. Are people supposed to wear their sweaters to that?

G: Oh yeah!

M: Okay, okay. I have my own, but it drips glitter every time I move.

G: You leave a trail?

M: Yeah. So I feel like in a pit, everyone is going to have glitter on them and be like, “It was that [asshole].”

G: (laughs) I love it. Yeah, you got to bring a sweater and uh… Christmas vibes.

M: Now, you were talking about how you work at the UCF Art Gallery. How does that passion for visual art merge with music? How do those things collide?

G: I use one thing to fuel the other. A lot of the artwork I’ve been doing in the past couple years has been for the band. And my job at the gallery makes [Bellows] possible.

M: What more traditional artists are you into?

G: I’ll just start by saying I have a huge print in my living room that’s framed. It’s a drawing from Da Vinci. I looked it up and it was like a couple hundred bucks, but I got it for like $12 at a thrift store. But there’s something that my professors would say: your competition isn’t like, the people in this classroom. That’s your immediate competition, but your competition to push yourself is every artist that’s ever lived.

M: Wow. That’s a lot of pressure.

G: Yeah, I guess. But I can’t compare or anything like that, obviously. But I like to keep that drawing up as a reminder like, “that’s your competition.”

M: Do you do the same thing with music?

G: I compare recordings. I try not to get stuck on the style of the music… It doesn’t matter if it’s the same genre, but I try to hold myself to the same level as bands I respect. I don’t want to be like, “I would listen to this all day long, but I wouldn’t listen to my shit.”

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M: (runs out of questions) So… is there anything you want to talk about?

I love to paint too. Whenever I paint, it’s not about anything. It’s just about color. You know, working with color and blending. I rarely clean my brush. I just continuously mix colors without cleaning. It’s kind of like that with a song where you want everything to be congruent, but kind of reactive and responding to itself.

M: You guys recently put out an EP [Day Changer].

G: It’s going to be an LP. It’s not released yet. I just released a couple songs off [of it]. We’re going to be releasing one or two at a time every couple months, and then we’ll have an LP come out somewhere, probably Spring 2015.

M: How many songs we lookin’ at for the LP?

G: Well, after we filter out everything, probably 10 to 12.

M: Awesome. Well, I appreciate you sitting down.

G: Yeah, thanks for talking to me.

Hometown Heroes: Bellows

On the couch, sipping tea with the smell of incense in the air: this is how I experienced the new sounds of Orlando experimental folk rock three-piece Bellows, and if you choose to listen for yourself, I suggest you immerse your ears in a similar environment. A constant influx of rain on your bedroom window also helps. Enjoy.

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Bellows is a band whose sound shapes its own atmosphere. Every element is a contributing factor to the overall mood of the music. Greyson Charnock’s vocals are a sonic wind expanded to gothic heights by heavy reverb, and his guitar work flows through each song with a voice of its own; its melodies are light on the ears and trail through a journey that’s a joy to follow.

Drummer Sean Boyle and bassist/pianist Patrick Dunn create a soft thunder that anchors Bellows’ songs firmly to the ground. Without the two’s crucial foundation, Charnock’s airy pieces would simply float away.

In 2012, the band released their debut EP, Hide or Seek. The follow-up Day Changer came earlier this year and features a tighter sound with more polished production. This clearer sound elevates the recordings to the same prestige as Bellow’s live show.



Speaking of live shows, Bellows is currently on tour and will be playing The Space this Friday with SWIMM and FayRoy. Check more dates below!

 Oct 3 – The Space, Orlando w/ SWIMM & FayRoy

Oct 4 – Plan B Festival – Ybor City, Florida

Oct 31 – Orlando Halloween Party w/ Pathos, Pathos & friends

Nov 7 – Saint Augustine, TBA

Nov 8– The Loft, Columbus, Georgia

Nov 15– Wills Pub, w/ The Dig (SF)

Dec 19 – The Space, Orlando Relief in Abstract presents: Bellows w/ Case Work

Dec 31 – New Years Party, The Animal House, Orlando

Jan 24 – Orlando TBA (day Fest)

Feb 14 – St. Petersburg, Fl, Attic Records presents: WhigFest

Pasty Cline – “Misery”

Pasty Cline is the moniker of Orlando musician Connor Lawhorne. Unlike his surf rock work with Girls on the Beach, Pasty Cline sees Lawhorne in a more personal light, however, this light feels more like darkness. “MIsery,” like all of Pasty Cline’s music, sounds lyrically and emotionally influenced by Johnny Cash and well, Patsy Cline. Enjoy.

More TVW articles featuring Pasty Cline: THANK YOU.

15 Days to Bonnaroo: First Aid Kit

Love a Bonnaroo band that I haven’t featured yet? Shoot me a Facebook message telling me of their greatness. Enjoy.

Bonnaroo Tip of the Day: Put soapy washcloths in plastic bags and bring them to Bonnaroo. Wet the washcloth, and BOOM! Insta-bath.

First Aid Kit – Saturday, June 14, 3:00 P.M. – This Tent

Similar Bonnaroo Sounds: Neutral Milk Hotel, The Head and The Heart, Ms. Lauryn Hill


First Aid Kit first broke onto the music scene in 2008, when the folk duo released a cover of Fleet Foxes’ “Tiger Mountain Peasant Song” on YouTube. Since then, Johanna and Klara Söderberg have released two albums, and our currently promoting their third, Stay Gold. 

The angelic harmonies of First Aid Kit are instantly captivating; I haven’t heard voices with such technical and emotional prowess in along time. Their music isn’t anything groundbreaking, but the authenticity and beauty in which it’s presented is nothing less than touching. I’m not even someone who is generally attracted to acts like First Aid Kit, but I can recognize talent, and I enjoy seeing talented people perform. If you feel the same way, than I hope to see you there!