Fat Night - 'Lazy Days' (ep review)

Fat Night – ‘Lazy Days’ (ep review)

Picture yourself sitting on a front porch on a beautiful Florida day, smokin’ cigarettes and watching the cars go by. Fat Night’s Lazy Days puts you there. The primary contributor appears to be the band’s deep roots in R&B and Latin vibes. Right off, skins (drums) walk on in with a jaunty jive, turning heads. You’re treated to laid-back strings (guitar), cruisin’ double time piano, and mellow guitar solo-ettes. The ride is as perfect and elusive as our chilled afternoon.

The organ and guitar carry you throughout the album on waves of reverb and pure groove, inviting you to experience the graceful dance of the two instruments, performed by talented hands. These elements rap around each other, only to suddenly repel, finally separating to show one another a thing or two. This is especially apparent on the tasty “Long Shadow Short Temper,” a fresh mix of call-and-return, paired to silky harmonies. A trippy organ solo leads you to the end of the street with the promise of a six-pack.

Regardless of the beautifully orchestrated keys and strings, one mustn’t detract from the marvelous vocals of the EP. The vocal lines take you on a ride down the coast with the top out and a damn good cigar to burn. Masterful use of triplets lends itself to the frequent off beats and groovy, riding bass. As if precise rhythms and sultry tones weren’t enough to keep your ear glued to your speakers, the vocal runs are capable of melting the frostiest of loins.            

Fat Night rounds off this lethargic afternoon with a conclusion, of sorts, with a drive into the sunset on “Thoughts.” As the sun comes down on Lazy Days, you receive a look-back, stylistically and emotionally, ending your journey as relaxed as you began it. ATTENTION SHOPPERS: Fat Night’s Lazy Days should go with you everywhere. It is fantastic for every occasion and will put you in the right mood every time. Keep it easy. Listen to Fat Night.

Fat Night – ‘Lazy Days’ (ep review) by Graham Johnson

Monophonics – “Promises”

San Francisco psych-soul band Monophonics just released a fresh 7″ titled Promises/Strange Love. The A-side “Promises” is James Bond-esque slow burner infused with melodic horn grooves and groovy guitar melodies. Redundancy aside, all of these bright colors are contained by tightly compressed rhythm section that acts as a backbone, bent after copious dance moves. Enjoy.

Catch Monophonics tonight at The Plaza with Galactic.

Caribou – “Can’t Do Without You” (Remixes)

Caribou’s album Our Love has been on non-stop as of late. The opener “Can’t Do Without You” is undoubtedly one of the best tracks of 2014, these remixes by Lenno, Munk & The Black Loops, and Tale Of Us & Mano Le Tough are as infectious. I couldn’t choose one, so you got three. Which is your favorite? Enjoy.

Caribou is playing at The Social next Tuesday! I’ll be there, so should you.

The Original:

 

Ghosthouse – “Carry On”

OOOooo scary! Ghosts! It’s Halloween. But, these ghost don’t want to spook; they want to party. Do you feel that bass? It’s not frightening, but it will definitely send shivers up your spine. Is that a fucking disco guitar solo? You’re damn right! Let’s exorcise those funking demons! Chicago boys Ghosthouse are all about fun, and I am very much about it. “I can be your Clark Kent, baby. You can be my Louis Lane.” Carry on boys! Enjoy.

Get down at Ghosthouse’s Soundcloud!

16 Days to Bonnaroo: Chromeo

Bonnaroo Tip of the Day: Don’t forget to Wang Chung before, during, and after every performance.

Chromeo – Saturday, June 14, 7:30 P.M. – Which Stage

Similar Bonnaroo Sounds: Fitz & The Tantrums, James Blake, Cut Copy



Chromeo are currently in the standings for best album title of 2014. The album I’m speaking of is White Women, and its contents matter much more than its title. Chromeo’s music is made for more than just Caucasian females to enjoy. All races and genders are welcomed, encouraged in fact, to groove to the electronic, discoesque, funk pop, music of Chromeo.

Upon initial listen, you can hear a variety influences from Hall & Oates to Daft Punk. Singer/guitar player Dave 1 lays down stanky funk and R&B riffs, whilst singing in a very Wang Chung “Everybody Have Fun Tonight” manner. Seriously, everything about Chromeo screams the 80’s: their fucking album is named White Women. What part of that doesn’t sound like a Culture Club? P-Thugg’s synths are so light and sweet, that this music begs to be danced to. So Bonnaroo? You wanna dance?