DoGs’ Swan Songs: Final Show TOMORROW

“As we go on, we remember
All the times we had together
And as our lives change, Come whatever
We will still be, friends forever”

*quiet sobbing* I promised myself I wouldn’t get emotional, but this goddamn Vitamin C song always pushes me to tears.

Tomorrow, Orlando punk three-piece DoGs will be playing their final show before being triumphantly euthanized. Since forming in July 2012, the band has released a catalogue of short, energetic, and singable tunes, while working their way into our hearts and onto our couches (you can purchase their entire catalogue for whatever price you want on their Bandcamp).

Yesterday, the boys dropped the last of their new material, a six song split cassette with RushmoreFL. Recorded back in September of 2014, DoGs skip the sob songs, and instead opt for the sporadic punk we know and love. They even throw in a Devo cover for good measure.

Please, go see DoGs final show tomorrow at St Matthew’s. Tickets are $5, and you get to see the most depressing loss since Marley & Me.

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Live Music: “Don’t Wake the Neighbors” EP Release Show featuring: Ricin House, yogurt smoothness, The Dull Blades, & The Vivid

Friday night was a great night for music. The Vivid celebrated the release of their first EP Don’t Wake the Neighbors with a star-studded show at Uncle Lou’s. The lineup consisted of Ricin House, yogurt smoothness, The Dull Blades, and The Vivid, all playing their own brand of garage rock. I’ve seen each band at least a half a dozen times, and consider them all to be some of Orlando’s best talent. Here is at testament of what went down on that crazy hazy night. Enjoy.

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Ricin House

Ricin House is a three piece punk DIY kind of band. Uncle Lou’s is home for Ricin House. They’ve been playing there for years, and the play-on-the-floor dive bar aesthetic works in Ricin’s favor. Seeing them play again at Lou’s reminds me of the time Iain smashed his guitar mid-set and ran out the door, in what could be the most rock n’ roll moment of my life. On stage, or rather on floor, Ricin House sounded better than ever, and the chemistry between band members is clear. Mercy plays the drums with more ferocity than anyone I’ve ever seen. She beats the holy hell out of her kit every time I see Ricin, and every wallop is technical and precise. Bassist Brian is similar. Together they build a tight rhythm section for Iain to go batshit all over. Iain’s guitar is unpredictable and wild. But, his voice is soulful, yet gritty, which made songs like “Simon” pop.

Find out more about Ricin House.

yogurt smoothness

What is there to say about yogurt smoothness that hasn’t already been said? Coming off their “Heavy Cream 2013 Tour,” these boys are still hungry for more tasty jams, and they proved that at Lou’s. Danilo said early in the set that they’re tired of playing their new songs, and because Orlando is where they cut their teeth, their old music was warmly welcomed.  During their set, I overheard The Vivid’s Brandon Kasper saying, “They sound different every time,” and that’s what yogurt smoothness do. They come out. Do their thing. And blow your mind with something new. EVERY TIME. Friday was no different.

Read my world renowned article: Hometown Heroes: Yogurt Smoothness

Find out more about yogurt smoothness.

The Dull Blades

If I were to summarize my freshman of college in one album, it would be The Dull Blades’ Less Production More Seduction. That year I probably saw The Dull Blades at least eight times. Friday however, had been over a year since I had seen the two-some of Nik Talbot and Anthony Fata blow my fucking doors off with blues rock wonderment. They came rushing back with a set of new songs from their upcoming second album (rumor has it that it’s titled Indullgence, but I didn’t say shit about that). On floor, Nik and Anthony are wonder twins of rock, with grooves so sweet you can’t help but dance. Nik’s guitar playing and voice make the ladies, and some men, swoon. Along with Anthony’s experience and power, The Dull Blades sound like a more interesting version of The Black Keys.

Find out more about The Dull Blades.

The Vivid

It’s their show, and they’ll rock if they want to. The Vivid closed out the night with some experimental garage punk. With the release of their first EP Don’t Wake the Neighbors, (review pending) The Vivid were on a high at the show. Their opener was “Riser,” the first single from DWTN. The song is a perfect description of the band, starting off with a reverb doused extended intro of shoegaze bliss, then coming down with a heavy riff, before settling into the chorus’ groove. As their set progressed, The Vivid played DWTN in its entirety, showcasing their different musical styles. I’ll talk more about DWTN in my full review, so stay tuned for that. Having been at almost every show The Vivid has played, I’ve seen them grow as a band. The harmonies between Cory Young and Brandon Kasper were tighter than ever, and with an ever-expanding arsenal of songs, the future for The Vivid looks very bright.

Find out more about The Vivid.

Artist Spotlight: Sonic Graffiti

Today is special! I recently received an email from St. Pete three-piece Sonic Graffiti, who thought I might like there stuff. Before I start, let me say thank you to everyone who has been supportive of The Vinyl Warhol so far. It is already doing better than I ever hoped, and I love hearing/reviewing new music from talented musicians. Enough with the emotional intro, I give you Sonic Graffiti. Enjoy.

If you make music, send it to me!

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Friendly Unit Creation Kit

Sonic Graffiti’s music can be described as neo-Zeppelin, barn burning rock n’ roll. Their debut EP, Friendly Unit Creation Kit, was released on June 1, is a gritty collage of rock, punk, rockabilly, and blues. This EP starts off right. “The Morning Electric” is the quintessential Sonic Graffiti song. It describes Sonic Graffiti, at there core, better than I ever could. Their loud, unapologetic, and you better get out of their way. Guitar licks that dance the fine line between  garage blues and heavy metal, and the bass doesn’t stop for a second, the groove alone will give you carpel tunnel. Drew (vocals/guitar) keeps it simple, no chorus here, just a group chant, that reminds me of Japandroids, and a pair of verses. Drew’s voice is reminiscent Rob Tyner of the MC5. On “Head in the Clouds” he shines as a vocalist, the delivery is convincing and the melody sticks.

Sonic Graffiti delivers riff-rock like old pros, but what’s good here is it never feels stale. They’re more aggressive than the bands their sound comes from, which can be highlighted in the sporadic guitar solos. Their long and numerous, but don’t feel at all forced. “Scribbles” is the wildest of all the tracks on Friendly Unit Creation Kit. The vocals are volatile, so much that the outro is cloaked in gristle of a voice about to break. I’ve never seen Sonic Graffiti live, but I’ll be damned if these songs don’t sound better in person.

The fifth track is a surprise. The guitars, drums, and bass are gone. They’re replaced with what I think is mandolin, because their Facebook says Drew plays mandolin, but to me it sounds like ukulele. There’s nothing wrong with a band putting in a slow song. But to go right from “Scribbles” into this, is too much of a change. I prefer garage rock bands to go more of the psychedelic route with their slower songs. Evan an acoustic guitar with a rolling beat would have fit better on Friendly Unit Creation Kit. I can appreciate the risk, but the mandolin/ukulele thing just contrasts too much the vocals.

Like Sonic Graffiti on Facebook.