photo by David Lawrence | iamdavidlawrence.com

Adjy + Thrift House @ Will’s Pub (review + photos)

Have you ever been caught talking shit? When a seemingly benign piece of gossip turns into a full-on social execution, the crypt of shame feels inescapable. Unless… you’re not the poor soul on the receiving end of embarrassment. Then it’s a goddamn riot. This was the horrifically hilarious scene that occurred last night at Will’s. And some bands played too. Enjoy.**

**This slightly entertaining anecdote is a dramatization created by my misunderstanding of a conversation, sponsored by PBR!

Thanks to David Lawrence for the photographs!

Like the victim of shit talking appearing at our table, I too fell out of the ether into Will’s. I just kinda showed up. And after a long day spent booking, I was glad to be there.

Once the event previously spewed into an introductory narrative occurred, my night really began with Thrift House. This neo-funk six-piece had talent to spare. Each member took his or her turn in front of the mic. And every one of these voices was their own, personality for days. Local singer and multi-instrumentalist Addison Muha sang like a new age Janis Joplin. Immediately afterward she switched to drums while the drummer belted a savory rock ‘n’ roll burner. It was like slow cooked ribs. Good eats.

Adjy + Thrift House Live Review | The Vinyl Warhol
photo by David Lawrence | iamdavidlawrence.com

Adjy closed out the night at Will’s. an Orlando collective sporting an uplifting brand of indie rock. It’s sure to cleanse the soul. The band exuded positive energy. Vocalist and multi-instrumentalist, Chris Noyles, threw his arms around the stage, air-hugging the entire audience as he sang. I was surprised to find out that Adjy hadn’t at one time been a praise band. I’m not sure that what I felt at Will’s was a god, but I their on-stage passion had me jiggling like good ‘ol Jimmy Christ.

Like Thrift House had earlier, most of the six-person band played numerous roles in the creation of the set. My favorite was the enthusiastic vibraphone player, Abbey Go. At one point she was joined by the light dings of a glockenspiel. Without further explanation or exploration, you should be able to deduce the kind of music Adjy play just by the inclusion of these to instruments. It’s light. It’s upbeat. It makes you feel good. Critics of enthusiasm may attack this band’s fervor, but burn the non-believers.

With that, my night at Will’s Pub ended. I meandered over to Lil Indies where Orlando blues/soul/funk legend Eugene Snowden was finishing a set with some fellow musicians. I’ve been lucky enough to see Eugene in action before, and whether he’s playing for a few or for few hundred people, one thing is constant: He’s on. And his energy pulls the best out of other musicians, who each took turns riffing on the band’s last song. Come see Eugene play with The Legendary JC’s this Sunday at Will’s 20th Anniversary Fest. I’m sure he’ll be in rare form.

TVW Zine Release Show | Thursday, 9/3/2015 | Will’s Pub | $5

In June we released our first zine, a compilation of photos and memories from our tour dairy with Me Chinese. This was originally intended to be a one-off. But, everyone at ZINE FEST was so encouraging, we couldn’t just stop. So with the support of a bunch of really talented Orlando artists, zine two is on the way. And after of the amazing time we had at our first show, WE ARE ANIMALS, we’ve decided to release the zine at a party with all our friends.

The Vinyl Warhol is an extension of the Orlando arts community, not just the music community, and we’re doing something a little different. We’re making a sandwich. Three bands will serve as the hearty bread, with spoken word in between slices as the pb & j in your ears. Orlando’s finest zines (ours is mediocre in comparison) will be set up like fine potato salad to feed your brain more syntax. Doors are at 8:30, music starts at 9:30 p.m. Enjoy your meal, menu below!

Huge thanks to Orlando musician/graphic artist, Cory Young, for our poster. If you see it around, steal it. 

MUSIC

The Knick-Knacks

The Knick-Knacks came to me via my friends in Pathos, Pathos at 3:30 a.m., in between my botched front flips into the band’s shared pool. The much more coordinated band members of Pathos2 praised the Melbourne-based garagesters’ live chops and catchy melodies. Coincidentally, one of their songs is called “CannonBall.”

yogurt smoothness

Almost two years ago — yes, we’ve been doing this shit that long — I wrote the twelfth post to appeared this blog, “Hometown Heroes: yogurt smoothness.” Baby writer, Matthew Weller, said, “The two create a wall of sound, punching you in the chest, demanding lunch money.” This was actually the first time I wrote about an Orlando band. Now, approximately 250 posts later, they’re playing our second show. Talk about “full circle.

adam and the plastic

I met two members of adam and the plastic at a barbecue joint on Colonial. I was talking about another project that’s in the works, and they wanted to play it. That’s still happening (wait for it, I am excited) and this is happening too. Do you like your indie rock unshaven and sounding like something fresh from The Factory? Maybe you don’t even know what that means. Maybe you think I’m insane. Listen to this:

ZINES

Tittie-Thyme

Tittie-Thyme is an exceptional group of people. Their ideology is empowerment and community, a theme that engulfs every release. Emotive personal stories, interesting how-tos, and humorous anecdotes will leave you walking away having learned something (why do I sound like a kid from Reading Rainbow?). Women are their focus. But their audience is genderless.

Is It Over Yet?

A bunch of punks got together and made Is It Over Yet?. And it’s fucking beautiful. Their zines are filled with drawings and paintings and poetry and photographs and essays, all done with authenticity and feeling. Looking through IIOY?’s releases is like strolling through a back alley art gallery. What you find is probably going to be hard to look at, but it’s going to grab ahold of you and demand something immediately.

let’s kiss

let’s kiss is a zine orchestrated by our own KARINA CURTO! She compiled a bunch of first kiss/time stories from her friends, and they’re really good reads. These are packaged along with some personal photos and artwork. I love it because it’s so Karina.

SPOKEN WORD

Spoken word will be taking place before each band, and if we have enough people who want to read, after. I was sleeping on the Orlando spoken word circuit for a while, but my eyes are now open, and I can see.

If you want to read, send me an email: matt@thevinylwarhol.com 

Here’s an unfinished list of our spoken word boys and girls:

  • Karina Suzanne
  • Young Moon
  • Troy Cunio
  • Cory Young
  • Lila Miller 
  • Emily Beth
  • Matador

fk mt. & No. @ The Space Station

Last week, Columbia, SC punk bands fk mt. and No. ran through The Space Station on their short FL/GA tour. YouTube user Max Power captured quick glimpses of the chaos via a handheld video recording device. I’m beyond thrilled that The Space Station is becoming a go-to venue for local and touring acts. If you haven’t been to an event at the College Park screen printing shop /slash/ music venue /slash/ leather studio (?), then you should really just retire, because you’re way out of touch. Or, you save your reputation by getting your face smashed-in at a show in black hole that is The Space Station’s backroom. Your choice.  Enjoy.

Watch Ben Katzman’s DeGreaser Shred The Space (New Cassette Out Now!)

Today is special. Today is the day that The Vinyl Warhol hosts its first-ever guest contributor. The man I am referencing is the insanely talented Christopher Garcia. For years, Christopher has been capturing local and non-local artists throughout Florida, and he is just as dedicated to developing the Orlando music community as I am. It’s awesome having Christopher working with us, and hopefully this won’t be a one-off appearance. If you’d like to check out his other work, head over to his photography Tumblr. Enjoy.

Boston-grown record label BUFU Records is the best thing to unfold as we roll into 2015. BUFU describes itself as a “Boston-based label that puts community first, BUFU Records has done our best to give local bands and music fans alike a place to come together and rock out.” They started the year off by bringing BUFU Fest to Miami with Boston heroes Free Pizza, Gods Dogs, and a new favorite, Ben Katzmann’s DeGreaser. BUFU Fest was the beginning of the Spread the Shred tour 2015 with special guests: Colleen Green, Ben Katzman’s Degreaser, and Miami’s The Jellyfish Brothers.

During the FL/GA tour’s stop at The Space, Ben Katzman’s DeGreaser hinted at a new album in collaboration with Portland-based tape label, Gnar Tapes. Now in February, Rok N Rol Community College has dropped as a declaration to the power of the shred. Each song shredding heavier and harder with a clear ode to the old school, but with an energy that is revitalizing DIY Rock n Roll. Check it out for yourself here and be sure to pick up the cassette on their Bandcamp!!

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GRANDMA PARTY 2014 LIVE: Idi Bidi Midi Comidi

TVW is coming to you live at Grandma Party 2014. There’s going to be great acts all day, and we will be supplying you with sexy pics. Sadly, we missed Ark and The Welzeins. First up is solo avant-electronic artist, Idi Bidi Midi Comidi. Keep your eyes locked for more acts. Wet Nurse is up next!

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Bellows: Linear Abstraction & Christmas Sweaters

Editor’s Note: Since this interview, the members of Bellows changed their name to Someday River

This year, no one is more overcome with holiday spirit than Orlando experimental folk rock trio, Bellows. These sonic sculptors have been at it since 2010; and in 2013, Orlando Weekly named them Best Experimental Act. I sat down with Bellows’ lead architect Greyson Charnock to talk about Orlando music, Bellows’ progression, and Christmas cheer. Later, I was able to encroach on the band’s practice space with TVW Photographer, Karina Curto. Somehow, we ended up helping them out with their Christmas cards. Enjoy.

This Saturday, Bellows’ will be playing at Sweater Fest. Come see Orlando’s finest take over The Milk District.

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M: Within the band, do you do most of the songwriting? How does that work?

G: Some of [Bellows’] earlier material was stuff that I had written that we just pieced together and turned into this structural thing. But we’re moving more into like, I might just come up with a little idea and we all just jam on it together. Then we say, “that works, this doesn’t work.” [We] sort of separate it out into a song that’s more grooved-based. Instead of [songs] based solely on transitions, or solely on the vocals, which is something I did a lot in the past.

M: That’s what collaboration does, right?

G: Yeah. We got Sean [Boyle] on drums, and Pat [Dunn] on the bass. And they’ve really helped crystallize the band. We were a two-piece for a while, and I think there’s a lot of being deliberate as a two piece. The idea is so pure. But, now that we have a bassist, I could never go back.

M: You guys have been [playing] for like, five years… almost five?

G: Yeah, five years from our first show is in February.

M: Five years is a long time, especially for a local band.

G: I didn’t have any expectations, honestly. When I first started writing music [after] I moved to college; it took me years to grasp the idea that, “Okay, there’s a next step to this.” Before that, I had no intentions of ever playing for anybody. Even open mics, I never did [those] until Bellows. That was the first time that I ever played live.

M: Really? How did it go?

G: (laughs) It went alright. It takes a long time to get your footing in a community… now it sort of feels like I can just feel the culture building, and it’s kind of cool to be a part of it.

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M: You guys are playing sweater fest. Are people supposed to wear their sweaters to that?

G: Oh yeah!

M: Okay, okay. I have my own, but it drips glitter every time I move.

G: You leave a trail?

M: Yeah. So I feel like in a pit, everyone is going to have glitter on them and be like, “It was that [asshole].”

G: (laughs) I love it. Yeah, you got to bring a sweater and uh… Christmas vibes.

M: Now, you were talking about how you work at the UCF Art Gallery. How does that passion for visual art merge with music? How do those things collide?

G: I use one thing to fuel the other. A lot of the artwork I’ve been doing in the past couple years has been for the band. And my job at the gallery makes [Bellows] possible.

M: What more traditional artists are you into?

G: I’ll just start by saying I have a huge print in my living room that’s framed. It’s a drawing from Da Vinci. I looked it up and it was like a couple hundred bucks, but I got it for like $12 at a thrift store. But there’s something that my professors would say: your competition isn’t like, the people in this classroom. That’s your immediate competition, but your competition to push yourself is every artist that’s ever lived.

M: Wow. That’s a lot of pressure.

G: Yeah, I guess. But I can’t compare or anything like that, obviously. But I like to keep that drawing up as a reminder like, “that’s your competition.”

M: Do you do the same thing with music?

G: I compare recordings. I try not to get stuck on the style of the music… It doesn’t matter if it’s the same genre, but I try to hold myself to the same level as bands I respect. I don’t want to be like, “I would listen to this all day long, but I wouldn’t listen to my shit.”

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M: (runs out of questions) So… is there anything you want to talk about?

I love to paint too. Whenever I paint, it’s not about anything. It’s just about color. You know, working with color and blending. I rarely clean my brush. I just continuously mix colors without cleaning. It’s kind of like that with a song where you want everything to be congruent, but kind of reactive and responding to itself.

M: You guys recently put out an EP [Day Changer].

G: It’s going to be an LP. It’s not released yet. I just released a couple songs off [of it]. We’re going to be releasing one or two at a time every couple months, and then we’ll have an LP come out somewhere, probably Spring 2015.

M: How many songs we lookin’ at for the LP?

G: Well, after we filter out everything, probably 10 to 12.

M: Awesome. Well, I appreciate you sitting down.

G: Yeah, thanks for talking to me.