just some songs. 2:12:2016

just some songs. (2/12/16)

Hey Everyone! Welcome to the 10th installment of “just some songs.,” a handful of tracks that have stuck with me as of late, with an accompanying blip about my thoughts and feelings, and an introduction to the artists who’ve composed them. If you’d like to have your music featured in the next edition, email me (matt@thevinylwarhol.com) and I’ll take a listen. All genres are welcome. Soundcloud is my preferred platform (it’s prettier). Enjoy.

SALES — “jamz”

SALES has hit the big time, and with pure candy-coated ear bliss like this, it’s easy to understand the two piece’s broad reach. I remember seeing them at Uncle Lou’s not long ago. Like is the case the grimiest, divey-est dive bar in Orlando, some seedy characters eventually rolled through. Giants draped in leather vests, a group of seven-to-ten bikers — we heard them coming three blocks away — took to the crowded venue looking for a drink. In less than five minutes, SALES smooth beats and vapor-like vocals had these ruffians swaying along. But, as is the case with SALES, these sweet sounds are just a guised for deeply personal and emotive lyrics. Tears fuck-up leather.

beachday — “plus 0ne” (feat. babeisland)

Let me tell you about nightcore. It’s new to me, so I thought a genre explanation was in order. Nightcore is a genre of dance music where twisted individuals speed-up previously existing bangers. The result is music that is too fast to dance to. Orlando nightcore aficionado beachday has made one of my favorite driving songs in recent memory with “plus one”. The chipmunk vocals pierce your brain until you’re asking random strangers the song’s repeated request.

Soapbox Soliloquy — “Oxy Hannah”

St. Pete pysch queen, Soapbox Soliloquy is back with “Oxy Hannah.” The first song off her upcoming full-length, Heady Stones. Here, Jasmine Deja comes through with her jangliest song yet. Her vocals sound deformed as she sings in an androgynous howl. If you’re in Tampa next Sunday, come by Frolic Exchange and see her as a part of Tiger Fawn’s “Little Fuckin’ Birdie Tour” — TVW booked it!

Rest In Peace — “Loss”

Grotesque producer CHVRLIEDR_OWN(R.I.P.) has a whole album’s worth of haunting industrial tunes on his Soundcloud. On “Loss,” he sounds like a mix between Trent Resnor and Blackstar David Bowie. The canvas he whispers over is minimal, but echoes like a damp cavern.

Graphs — “House Sitting”

Man, I love indie pop. Much like SALES, Graphs is shepherded by vocals that defy gravity; my feet lift off the ground when I here such airy coos. The instrumentals are just as drawling, liquid xanax for the soul. After the 80 mph speed binge that is “plus one,” this will have you lounging on cloud downer.

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Pleasures The RUB Review

EP review: PLEASURES – ‘The RUB’

pleas·ure – (n.) a feeling of happy satisfaction and enjoyment.

I caught my first glimpse of PLEASURES at GROWTH, a half-show, half-visual spectacle that served as the unveiling of a mobile light installation from Orlando musician/artist, ARK. PLEASURES played directly before ARK. No doubt. He picked the right band. The spacey bliss of PLEASURES lulled the audience into a trance; a blanket of warm synthesizers wrapped each individual. This feeling translates directly onto their beautifully produced debut-EP, The RUB. Enjoy.

Three of the four songs that make-up The RUB are over five minutes long. Each one of them whips and whirls the listener through space and time, as instruments crash over each other. On the opener, “Everything Forever,” the guitar and synth are subdued during the verses, but pulse with intense color in the instrumental breaks between them. They continue to soar higher and higher, finally exploding into stardust after almost six minutes. Vocalist Katherine Kelly seems to control them with her heavily modulated commands. She cries, “I want you.”

These robotic vocals glitch out on the next song, “Gemini Twin.” The synths do the same, firing like malfunctioning lasers. It’s important to note that these wild elements are always offset by a tight, precise rhythm section. Check the infectious drum beat on “Man is A God.” It forms a launching pad for the other instruments.

For as weird as The RUB is, its most supernatural moment is the final track, “Tryna Get The Honey From The Pot.” A pounding electronic beat serves as a pallet for Kelly’s twisted coos. The layers of sound bind to form a wall of static. We have truly transcended this space. Then, the EP just stops. Probably, a sucked into a black hole or some shit. 

Gallery

Pathos, Pathos, Pathos, Pathos, Pathos, PATHOS (review + photos)

Recently, photographer Christopher Garcia and I paid Orlando indie rock quartet Pathos, Pathos a visit while they were practicing for their EP release show. He brought his camera, and I sat in the corner and watched. Work hard. Play hard. Here are photographs from that session, along with my thoughts on Pathos, Pathos’ debut EP, Familiar Homes. Enjoy.

Pathos, Pathos at WE ARE ANIMALS (our first show) featuring fellow Orlando acts Pasty Cline, Witch Kings, and Tiger Fawn, and Brooklyn psych rock outfit, Stuyedeyed.

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“Darling I’ve been seeing a reflection of myself in your eyes.
Oh paint me all the colors of the sky.
Blues and greens fill up my insides.” 

The sounds on Familiar Homes are like a bite of out a sweet, crisp apple on a beautiful day. Matthew Walsh’s sugary vocal melodies ring throughout these songs, weaving in and out of the light-as-air guitar lines. Simply put, these songs are pleasing to my ears.

So there’s sweet, let’s move on to crisp. All of the instrumentation on Familiar Homes, like the guitar lines I mentioned, sounds phenomenal. As a live band, Pathos, Pathos has chops. I’m glad that talent shines through on the recordings. On songs like “Tiger” and “Speak In Tongues,” each instrument is clear and pops in its own way.

FAV TRACKS: “Tiger,” “Show Me Love,” “Blues and Greens”

DoGs’ Swan Songs: Final Show TOMORROW

“As we go on, we remember
All the times we had together
And as our lives change, Come whatever
We will still be, friends forever”

*quiet sobbing* I promised myself I wouldn’t get emotional, but this goddamn Vitamin C song always pushes me to tears.

Tomorrow, Orlando punk three-piece DoGs will be playing their final show before being triumphantly euthanized. Since forming in July 2012, the band has released a catalogue of short, energetic, and singable tunes, while working their way into our hearts and onto our couches (you can purchase their entire catalogue for whatever price you want on their Bandcamp).

Yesterday, the boys dropped the last of their new material, a six song split cassette with RushmoreFL. Recorded back in September of 2014, DoGs skip the sob songs, and instead opt for the sporadic punk we know and love. They even throw in a Devo cover for good measure.

Please, go see DoGs final show tomorrow at St Matthew’s. Tickets are $5, and you get to see the most depressing loss since Marley & Me.

SALES – “Renee” (Tiny Desk Submission)

Orlando duo SALES have yet to perform on NPR’s Tiny Desk series, but looking at their submission video, NPR is missing out. Lauren Morgan’s vocals fit oh so perfectly with the intimate ambience of the video’s mood; it’s easy to lose yourself in this two-some’s cozy sounds. Enjoy.

Hear SALES’ latest EP at their Bandcamp.

 

Bellows: Linear Abstraction & Christmas Sweaters

Editor’s Note: Since this interview, the members of Bellows changed their name to Someday River

This year, no one is more overcome with holiday spirit than Orlando experimental folk rock trio, Bellows. These sonic sculptors have been at it since 2010; and in 2013, Orlando Weekly named them Best Experimental Act. I sat down with Bellows’ lead architect Greyson Charnock to talk about Orlando music, Bellows’ progression, and Christmas cheer. Later, I was able to encroach on the band’s practice space with TVW Photographer, Karina Curto. Somehow, we ended up helping them out with their Christmas cards. Enjoy.

This Saturday, Bellows’ will be playing at Sweater Fest. Come see Orlando’s finest take over The Milk District.

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M: Within the band, do you do most of the songwriting? How does that work?

G: Some of [Bellows’] earlier material was stuff that I had written that we just pieced together and turned into this structural thing. But we’re moving more into like, I might just come up with a little idea and we all just jam on it together. Then we say, “that works, this doesn’t work.” [We] sort of separate it out into a song that’s more grooved-based. Instead of [songs] based solely on transitions, or solely on the vocals, which is something I did a lot in the past.

M: That’s what collaboration does, right?

G: Yeah. We got Sean [Boyle] on drums, and Pat [Dunn] on the bass. And they’ve really helped crystallize the band. We were a two-piece for a while, and I think there’s a lot of being deliberate as a two piece. The idea is so pure. But, now that we have a bassist, I could never go back.

M: You guys have been [playing] for like, five years… almost five?

G: Yeah, five years from our first show is in February.

M: Five years is a long time, especially for a local band.

G: I didn’t have any expectations, honestly. When I first started writing music [after] I moved to college; it took me years to grasp the idea that, “Okay, there’s a next step to this.” Before that, I had no intentions of ever playing for anybody. Even open mics, I never did [those] until Bellows. That was the first time that I ever played live.

M: Really? How did it go?

G: (laughs) It went alright. It takes a long time to get your footing in a community… now it sort of feels like I can just feel the culture building, and it’s kind of cool to be a part of it.

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M: You guys are playing sweater fest. Are people supposed to wear their sweaters to that?

G: Oh yeah!

M: Okay, okay. I have my own, but it drips glitter every time I move.

G: You leave a trail?

M: Yeah. So I feel like in a pit, everyone is going to have glitter on them and be like, “It was that [asshole].”

G: (laughs) I love it. Yeah, you got to bring a sweater and uh… Christmas vibes.

M: Now, you were talking about how you work at the UCF Art Gallery. How does that passion for visual art merge with music? How do those things collide?

G: I use one thing to fuel the other. A lot of the artwork I’ve been doing in the past couple years has been for the band. And my job at the gallery makes [Bellows] possible.

M: What more traditional artists are you into?

G: I’ll just start by saying I have a huge print in my living room that’s framed. It’s a drawing from Da Vinci. I looked it up and it was like a couple hundred bucks, but I got it for like $12 at a thrift store. But there’s something that my professors would say: your competition isn’t like, the people in this classroom. That’s your immediate competition, but your competition to push yourself is every artist that’s ever lived.

M: Wow. That’s a lot of pressure.

G: Yeah, I guess. But I can’t compare or anything like that, obviously. But I like to keep that drawing up as a reminder like, “that’s your competition.”

M: Do you do the same thing with music?

G: I compare recordings. I try not to get stuck on the style of the music… It doesn’t matter if it’s the same genre, but I try to hold myself to the same level as bands I respect. I don’t want to be like, “I would listen to this all day long, but I wouldn’t listen to my shit.”

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M: (runs out of questions) So… is there anything you want to talk about?

I love to paint too. Whenever I paint, it’s not about anything. It’s just about color. You know, working with color and blending. I rarely clean my brush. I just continuously mix colors without cleaning. It’s kind of like that with a song where you want everything to be congruent, but kind of reactive and responding to itself.

M: You guys recently put out an EP [Day Changer].

G: It’s going to be an LP. It’s not released yet. I just released a couple songs off [of it]. We’re going to be releasing one or two at a time every couple months, and then we’ll have an LP come out somewhere, probably Spring 2015.

M: How many songs we lookin’ at for the LP?

G: Well, after we filter out everything, probably 10 to 12.

M: Awesome. Well, I appreciate you sitting down.

G: Yeah, thanks for talking to me.