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Unknown Unknowingness: The Electro-Soul of Chakra Khan

Alexandra Love and DiViNCi have been making music together for over a decade now. After numerous albums as half of hip hop quartet Solillaquists of Sound, last year the two released their first album, Love Is At The Core, under a new banner, Chakra Khan. This explosion of electro-soul was quickly followed up by The Cope Aesthetic, released earlier this year. The three of us met via computer screen to dive into this mysterious project. Enjoy.

Upcoming Events:

August 14: Chakra Khan w/ Emily Fontano @ Timucua Arts White House

matthew warhol: I know the two of you have been working together for very long time in Solillaquists of Sound, but coming together for Chakra Khan, how did that come about?

Alexandra Love: We’ve been talking about doing something together like since we started. De, I think the first thing we did together was we made an album just you and I.

DiViNCi: Yeah, that’s actually how we met, through Swam. Swam and Alex came down to visit. When she was living in Chicago and came to Orlando, her and I made an album the week she was here.

Alexandra Love: And then, we’ve just been talking about trying to do something—not like that album again, but just something the two of us.

DiViNCi: Yeah because, on each Solillaquists album, we would do a song where it was just her and me. There was Beautiful Catastrophe.” There was “The Curse.” And we’ve always said, “We need to make an album of this stuff, stuff like that this.” And then when it came time to do Chakra Khan—it wasn’t even called Chakra Kahn—it was just a show. When we when we went to prepare for the show, we made a bunch of material for the show. Those songs kind of kick-started the idea of like, “We can just make this into an album, now.” And at that show, Alex was like on stage and she said, “We’re going to call ourselves Chakra Khan.”

[laughs]

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matthew warhol: Did you know about the name before she said it?

DiViNCi: Right before we went stage she mentioned something about it. I thought she was joking a little bit at first, but then when she said on stage I was like, Well that’s it.”

matthew warhol: Having worked together in the past on these one-off songs, was that kind of the basis for writing new material, or were you trying to do something completely different?

Alexandra Love: It was kind of like that, but we have developed a sort of way of making music that’s not really forced. So it was just kind of what happened in the moment, kind of combination of the past and future.

DiViNCi: If you listen to the stuff that was just her and I on the Solillaquists albums, it all sounds like it could have been on the same album. We have different tastes, but when it comes time to make something for either one of them, it’s like the stuff that we overlap on. So if like I’m gonna making something for Swam, it’s going to be a lot more in the hip hop realm. But when I make stuff with Alex, it’s going to be a lot more etherial or ambient or soulful. At the time when we’re making this stuff for the Chaka Khan album, I finally found a pocket of music that combined a little bit of a hard element with that. I was exploring and it kind of became the sound of that album and a template for the future stuff.

matthew warhol: When you were working on the album, is it a completely collaborative thing where you’re in a studio together or is it sending ideas back and forth?

Alexandra Love: It’s back and forth.

DiViNCi: But we live together, so there’s that. So when you say we’re in the studio, you know we’re in our separate studios.

matthew warhol: Wait, so you’re in the same house right now?

Alexandra Love: Yeah!

[laughs]

DiViNCi: I’m downstairs, the air conditioning is broken so I’m not working in my studio.

Alexandra Love: I’m upstairs because I like my cave.

matthew warhol: That’s funny. So where does that start? Is it always one person having a thing and sharing it with the other? Where are those sparks coming from?

Alexandra Love: It’s really random and based on inspiration. So it could be I have an idea for song and I just record it to a click track, and then I give it to him, or he has stem of something and he gives it to me and I write to it. It’s just kind of always whatever it is, that sounds so lame but thats just what it is.

matthew warhol: With the most recent project, how was it different than the one you put out before? Was there a reason for the quick turn around?

DiViNCi: We only took a couple of weeks off between finishing the first record and starting the second. We’re pretty much doing same thing again. I think it’s pretty much separated by a couple of days a year apart, the first and second album. And when we were finishing up production for the second album, I was already putting stuff in our Dropbox folder for potential stuff for the new album.

Alexandra Love: It’s like it’s part of the same expression just because we’re always expressing where we are in our lives, but it’s a different part of the same expression. If the first record was one place then this new one would be like the bridge that’s leading to the next place.

DiViNCi: While there was very little time in between them, each definitely captured a moment productivity together—like and where we are at. And the second one totally has its own sound. They’re slightly different from each other but they live in the same universe.

matthew warhol: Could you put those differences in words… or even feelings?

Alexandra Love: For me, Love Is At The Core is about being in this new comfortable place of like awareness and self-expression. And then The Cope Aesthetic is more about venturing out of our comfort zones and how learning to cope with things can have a beauty to it. But it’s also got more tension to it. So Love Is At The Core is definitely more subtle, andThe Cope Aesthetic is sort of reaching into this new place and trying to illustrate the beauty in our journey.

DiViNCi: Sonically they differ a little too. Love Is At The Core there’s a little bit more electronic elements and, dare I say, a little bit more trap elements. Then The Cope Aesthetic its a lot more jazzy. It’s Jazz, but it has a mature sound to it too that we both didn’t purposely engineer.

matthew warhol: With those kind of more, for lack of a better term, natural elements, Alex, for you writing on top of that does it pull different emotions out of you?

Alexandra Love: Yeah, for some of them it was like just a piano or just a loop of piano for five minutes. And I record to it and then I give it back to him and then he would engineer around it. It’s a beautifully independent comma co-creative process.

DiViNCi: That process was something we did for both albums. The song “Love Is At The Core” is literally a two bar piano loop that I made in 2011. She heard it, and I always liked it just the way it was, and when she heard it, she said, “Ooo, I really like that.” But if I showed that to anybody else they would be like, “Are you going to do anything else to it?” She wanted it just like that. And when she recorded to it, exactly as you hear her vocals on there, it’s exactly how she recorded to the track when it was just the piano loop. And I took that and put drums to it, put bass to it, put everything around it. I like that process so much because I always felt compelled to get an idea out and just stop. That’s how I would describe the consistent approach to this material, get the things that feel like the embodiment of the mood.

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matthew warhol: Alex, when you’re writing over the instrumentals, are you sitting down with a pen and paper or is it off the top?

Alexandra Love: It’s so interesting because I don’t feel like I’m actually answering your questions, because I’m saying it’s everything for everything.

[laughs]

matthew warhol: I don’t know if that means I’m good or I’m bad.

Alexandra Love: I think that means you’re spectacular.

matthew warhol: I hope.

Alexandra Love: It just depends on what I feel in the moment. What I learned about myself is that when I try it one way, it doesn’t work all the time. But if I stay open, it always works out.

DiViNCi: I have a question actually? Are there any particular songs that you remember having a certain process that kind of stood out to you?

Alexandra Love: Yeah, “Bravery Today” and “Stay” and “Notice” are all freestyled.

[matthew and D together] Wow…

DiViNCi: Lyrics too?

Alexandra Love: Yeah, oh yeah, everything.

DiViNCi: So kind of like Wu Tang and Jay Z?

Alexandra Love: I don’t know about Wu Tang.

DiViNCi: No, I know RZA would go into the studio and freestyle and just stop when it fell off. Then he’d come back to it.

Alexandra Love: For those songs, I freestyle the whole thing at once and went back and recorded it in a way that was the same, but sounded cleaner.

DiViNCi: That’s really cool.

matthew warhol: Have you always been able to do that?

Alexandra Love: Yeah, I’ve always been able to do that. For me, when I tune into an emotion it’s easy for me to express the perimeters of it. Not easy, but it’s natural.

matthew warhol: I always thought, especially when it comes to singing, it always reminds me to painterly expression. Impressionistic painters painted Ala Prima where it’s just them in the moment. Nothing is planned. They’re capturing the light at one specific moment.

Alexandra Love: Yeah, and what’s so beautiful about the music that De gave me for this album; it made that easy.

DiViNCi: It’s cool to hear you say that, because a lot of that music was made in the same way. A lot of that stuff is stream of consciousness music writing. I did this talk in Berlin last year about submitting to your body, surrendering to your body, as apposed to thinking about it. This is a practice I’ve been trying to get better at. That’s what I’ve learned from performing, my best stuff comes out when I’m losing myself.

Alexandra Love: I think all of life is better when we do that.

DiViNCi: I’ve been talking about this a lot lately. Even people who are atheists, they don’t have to believe in a greater power. You can just believe in something bigger than yourself. A lot of people think of their mind as themselves, but you have to think bigger. And your body is bigger.

Alexandra Love: Even if it’s just your future self. Our future selves our bigger than our present selves.

matthew warhol: I think it’s really cool that we’re getting into this high level, spiritual talk because I get a lot of that from your music. Is this how you guys talk when it’s just the two of you?

[laughs]

Alexandra Love: Totally!

matthew warhol: I love that.

DiViNCi: I guess a lot of people don’t talk about it to much, but it’s our career to address these things and wield them.

matthew warhol: And to me, that’s a good conversation, that’s a good painting, that’s a good piece of music, something where you can get beyond superficial. Talking about the next project, what’s the next place? What’s shape is it taking at this current time?

Alexandra Love: It’s developing, for me anyway, into… If The Cope Aesthetic was about how we deal with things and the beauty that can come when being in the moment and dealing with shit, then this is about arriving in a new place and exploring it.

DiViNCi: Well that’s cool to hear you say that. It’s always funny—us working together for so long and becoming in tune with our relationship with each other and what “us” is—it’s so easy for us to hear the intention in each other’s music. We don’t have to speak about it. This is the most Alex and I have talked about these projects. [laughs] We don’t plan it out, so much as we’ve been planning it out for 15 years. It’s cool to hear us being charged with the task of putting words to these things.

Alexandra Love: So thank you for asking the questions because it makes a huge difference.

matthew warhol: Aww…

DiViNCi: Or, no thank you, and you just ruined everything.

[laughs]

matthew warhol: You’ll never write a song together ever again.

[laughs]

Alexandra Love: No, it’s a great thing.

DiViNCi: Finding a new place is cool because, sonically, the more albums a project put out, the more I feel free to explore new territory. The way I always think about producing albums, I think about the story a catalog tells of an artist or group. I think the new music—again, very beginning stages—is that much more of a departure, dare I say, weirder.

August 14: Chakra Khan w/ Emily Fontano @ Timucua Arts White House

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Florida Men: Pathos, Pathos

Since February 2015, Pathos, Pathos has released three EPs. The first two, titled Familiar Homes and Pet Names, are filled with shimmery indie pop/rock tunes, stuffed of melody and hooks, hooks, hooks. With their latest, a four song project titled Lucky Charm, they’ve taken a step further, maturing as musicians and song writers. Don’t let the goofy banana cover fool you, this is a semi-concept project about a man turning his dead wife into a mannequin. I’ll let the boys explain it for themselves.

Photos by matthew warhol, edits by Alexia Clarke.


matthew warhol: I remember, the first time I saw you guys, was when Alexia and I went to your first EP release at that really hot house party. I don’t know, I feel like you guys have been a local band that I routinely listen to, and I have very strong memories of listening to your music. So that’s why I wanted to talk. I love you guys.

Frank Jesmar Palencia: I love you.

matthew warhol: How long has it been? When did you guys start?

Matt Walsh: Not too long, er, earlier before that—too long-li-er before that.

[laughs]

James Murphy: I think it was 2013. I moved here in 2012 and we met not long after that, and our first show was February 2013.

Matt Walsh: So it’s been like three and a half years.

matthew warhol: Wow that’s such a long time. I feel like so old talking about that. How has your attitude changed since then? You were so fresh-faced, do you think you’ve been hardened?

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Matt Walsh: I think we’re a super hard band…

[laughs]

James Murphy: We’re super tough.

Matt Walsh: They look at us now and are like, “Wow, I don’t want to fuck with those guys.”

matthew warhol: But like dealing with all the BS that comes with being in a band…

Matt Walsh: I feel more comfortable doing shows on our terms, rather than being the babies who play any show. Four times a week seemed like a good idea. I think we’re more aware of the business side of being a band.

matthew warhol: You’re controlling it a lot more, reaching out to who you want to play with. Do you think you’re having better shows now?

Frank Jesmar Palencia: Now we know not to book the same place within the span of a few months.

James Murphy: It’s all trial and error.

matthew warhol: You guys almost broke up at some point, right?

Matt Walsh: Yeah, we took a break… I don’t know why. I was just having a really hard time writing. It’s a lot of work, especially booking tours.

James Murphy: I think we were all super busy at that time too. It was my last two semesters of college. I was doing 40 hours a week at my job.

Matt Walsh: And I think it was when Woodie left. We didn’t have a bass player, and just thinking about, “Do I want to teach all of these songs to someone, again?”

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matthew warhol: Why do you think you’ve kept doing it, pushing forward despite losing members?

James Murphy: It’s a lot of fun.

Matt Walsh: I love it. It’s cool thinking back like, “Wow, this is how we did this then, and why?” I think it was 2015, we were about to come out with a new record, playing Will’s Pub one night, and it felt like a turning point like, “Is someone singing? Did that happen?”

James Murphy: It was just friends before. We knew everyone. The next time, it was random, people we didn’t know were singing.

matthew warhol: I want to dig into what you would say to yourself if you were starting from the beginning. What’s the thing you’ve learned that’s helped the most? It can be from the business side or playing together, whatever you want.

Frank Jesmar Palencia: Business side, we did all our own research on how we should be booking or how we should draft a pitch to venues out-of-state. Talking to other bands, trying to find the styles that would fit with us. We learned a lot booking our first tour.

Matt Walsh: It kinda sucks because I feel like most bands start purely being about fun, but you have to learn all this shit. With that comes better shows or maybe respect within the community. It’s almost like having a second job, coming home and booking. There’s got to be passion for sure.

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matthew warhol: What about you, James? Maybe something more on the music side of things.

James Murphy: I was in metal and punk bands before. I never really played this kind of music before I started playing with you guys. You know, everyone did the whole scene thing…

matthew warhol: I didn’t. I was never into that.

Matt Walsh: Yeah, me neither. You were the scene boy.

James Murphy: I am scene, now and forever. [laughs] I just realized that all this is going to be documented. I only knew people who played on the heavier side—August Burns Red, that side of music—but I always wanted to start a lighter band, like a pop band. When I moved up here and started playing music with Matt, I was like, “Wow, this is way different from what I’m used to.” And Matt also being a drummer, took my skills of only knowing punk and hardcore drums and tampered it down to this whole other thing. He’s come up with a lot of drum parts that I never would have thought of.

Matt Walsh: I feel like there’s still parts in songs that you can hear influence of your punk style of drumming—which I think is so cool—and that’s what helps us keep our sound fresh.

matthew warhol: I especially think as a pop band—and I think I might have said this in a previous piece—I don’t generally like very light, indie pop rock or whatever. But something I’ve always enjoyed about our music is how it varies so much all in one song. How you’re able to essentially cut three different songs into one thing where the feeling or pace of the song will jump around. How does that work when you’re creating the songs? That’s what keeps me interested.

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Matt Walsh: Sure, and that’s a lot of reason why I write that way—very influenced by Max Bemis of Say Anything. He’s like the king of that. And it’s keeping me, the listener, engaged. And I think that’s important because there’s so much music out there. You’re making them wonder what part is coming next.

matthew warhol: So how do you use that?

Matt Walsh: For the writing process, I normally will come up with a standard song structure. And I’ll write a first verse, but know that the second verse has to have something different. It feels like its own thing.

matthew warhol: For me, it’s a credibility thing. I feel like a lot of songs are cheap with how repetitive they are. Some of my favorite songs of yours will start one place and end somewhere completely different. And I think that’s why people sing along to your songs too, because so many parts stick out. Going back to the evolution of everything, how has the music changed on this new EP?

Matt Walsh: Going back to James’s punk/metal past, when we started hanging out I had really only listened to indie pop. He opened me up to punk, Touche Amore, Single Mothers, that kinda stuff. I tried to write more like that. It’s a good combination of that.

matthew warhol: On the new EP?

Matt Walsh: Yeah, it’s a four song EP. Two of the songs are pretty standard for us, very poppy. Two songs are a little darker. I think my song writing is maturing a little bit, even with lyrical content. I’m now being influenced by things I wasn’t before.

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Frank Jesmar Palencia: When I first joined the band, I really only played acoustic guitar…

matthew warhol: I remember, they used to make fun of you, being like, “This guy sucks.”

[laughs]

Matt Walsh: What?!

matthew warhol: The first time we all hung out, you were like, “Frank’s always fuckin’ up!” [laughs] You’ve always been the fall guy in the band.

Matt Walsh: And how he’s glorified on a t-shirt. Does that make up for it?

Frank Jesmar Palencia: I think so… Anyways, so only playing acoustic, I had to relearn how to do melodies. It’s different from my style of playing, so after three years I’ve started to learn tones more. I’ve become a pedal snob. I’ve grown a lot.

Matt Walsh: Fuck you, Frank!

matthew warhol: We were talking, before we started recording, about one of the new songs being about the afterlife. Is that something that you’ve touched on before?

Matt Walsh: I used to be afraid to touch on religion. I’m personally not religious, but when I write songs I try not to write them about myself. This EP—and I don’t know if this is me creating this after I’ve put the songs in order—but we have a song called “The Past Of Our House,” that’s about this Florida man whose wife passed away, and he stuffed her essentially, preserved her body and kept her. I just thought the idea of that was so crazy and I wanted to write a song about it. The song directly following that is about the afterlife.

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matthew warhol: What is it called?

Matt Walsh: It’s called “Will I Meet You?” I think that song is just as much about me than it’s about that story. It deals a lot with legacy too. I’m the youngest in my family, and what if I don’t want to have kids? That’s it, my family name is going to be gone which is weird to think about.

matthew warhol: That definitely seems heavier than, “I know that you like. I know that you like me. I know that you like me. I know that you like me.”

[laughs]

Matt Walsh: I may have grown as a lyricist.

[laughs]

matthew warhol: Is that just part of getting older, you think, writing songs and thinking about family legacies?

Matt Walsh: It definitely comes with growing up. I’m 24 and a lot of people are thinking about getting married and having kids. Going back to the theme of the whole thing, I expanded that story of the Florida man with the first couple songs. I don’t know what their real life story was, but the first song is about them meeting and in my mind the woman knew, whether it was cancer or something, knew she wasn’t going to make it. They bloomed this relationship without him knowing. Then the second song is about their relationship blossoming. I haven’t really talked about this with anyone.

Frank Jesmar Palencia: Yeah, this is the first time I’ve heard this. I knew “The Past Of Our House” was about it.

James Murphy: I didn’t know any of this.

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Matt Walsh: Yeah, we don’t normally talk about lyrics. I don’t think ever. I don’t even know if you guys know the lyrics. It’s weirdly a personal thing to where I don’t normally feel comfortable talking about it, but singing about it is different.

matthew warhol: It’s more obtuse. Is there a lyric actually about stuffing a body?

Matt Walsh: Yeah, it’s “All the wax and wire fills your frame.”

James Murphy: I knew the meaning of that song and the story, but I didn’t know this is technically a concept EP.

Matt Walsh: It kind of came together as I was piecing the record together. And the last song is more about me, but it could relate to him like, “My wife is dead. Now what?” What’s he going to do? Maybe that’s why he did it. He’s not ready to accept that maybe that’s it.

matthew warhol: I remember I was talking to one you guys and you said that in the greater scene of the Orlando music scene you don’t feel accepted, something along the lines of that. Matt, I think we were talking about this.

Matt Walsh: I think that Orlando is so diverse and there’s a ton of bands. There’s such a big scene and with that comes cliques. You can’t prevent. I don’t know if it’s because we’ve earned respect by playing shows or what, but I don’t necessarily feel that as much as I used to. And I really think that Marshal [Rones] has a big part in bringing the community together. I think he’s done wonders for Orlando. He’ll put people together and everyone’s meeting everyone. It should be easy because it’s a community. I think Orlando, in the last three years, has grown a lot.

Frank Jesmar Palencia: I really like our music scene, actually. I feel like now that we’ve gone around Florida, I really think our music scene here is huge. It makes you appreciate what you have.

Matt Walsh: Most places in Florida, I’m like, “I miss Orlando.”

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Veiny Hands Release “Mountain Goat” Video

St. Pete darlings Veiny Hands have been kicking ass for a year-and-a-half now, but they’ve really turned up the heat on this new song/video. The video, directed and edited by Michelle Primiani, features the foursome ripping through the “Mountain Goat” while their movements blur beneath a saturated filter. Enjoy.

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The Ashtray Sweat Weather

The Ashtray – ‘Sweat Weather’ (ep review)

The Ashtray is an Orlando garage rock trio whose debut EP Sweat Weather was released just a few weeks ago on April 26. The band features TVW contributor Andres Andrade on fuzzed-out guitar, acting as a thick base for Brendan (vocals/guitar) and Paul (drums) to go absolutely insane and leap off of. Brendan’s vocals on songs like “Late Last Week” and “P I N K” sound like the walls of his throat are caving in. He holds nothing back.

Although a short four songs, Sweat Weather covers a lot of distorted ground, jumping in-and-out of punk, garage rock, noise, Pixies-esque grunge, and sad boy emo–there’s even elements of drone in the walls of guitar I previously mentioned. EPs often get overlooked as the precursor to a full-length album, but I’ve always seen them as band’s compacted mission statement. Four or five really good songs is so much better than an album bogged down with filler. And at less than 10 minutes, Sweat Weather is a great snack of a listen that feels like a journey through noise both past and present. 

just some songs. (11/13)

just some songs. (11/13)

Before I brought this song to experimental folk artist Tiger Fawn’s attention, she didn’t even know it existed. According to TF, a bunch of students reworked the song for class, and this particular remix made its way onto the internet. Thank dog it did.

I’ve been keeping up with the Soundcloud of Orlando MC Bernz for a minute now. He drops new music almost every week, all of which contain a top notch instrumental and Bernz’s ever-changing flow. This new track, “INSANE,” is no exception — the hook is monster!

DVWEZ is the moniker of Drogue Record‘s Delia Albert. The PBR&B songstress’ sweet lulls are so smooth as BUTTA. The instrumental on “Haunted” is just that, an eerie sweeping electronic, produced by Albert and fellow Orlando dynamo, Dromes.

I was introduced to yrs*trly through fellow producer, Side C. Both are members of With Love., a collective of supremely talented electronic artists, all based out of Orlando. With “greetz2.0,” I’m instantly thrown into a euphoric relaxation. This is music to get lost in.

“Satellite” is the third song off of Island Science’s forthcoming debut release. This melancholic drone pop outfit has yet to play live — fyi girls, people want it.

just some shows. (11/12 – 11/14)

While perusing my never-ending borage of Facebook event invites (not complaining, I like doing things.), I noticed that there’s some good shit happening this week. Too much to ignore. These are by no means the only excellent events happening this week, but they’re the ones I’m not missing. Enjoy.

THURSDAY

A Rock & Roll Picture Show

Thursday, Uncle Lou’s is serving-up a hearty plate of Central Florida rock & roll. Included in this six band lineup are rowdy duo Dose Amigos, lo-fi loner BLCH, and The Ashtray, an alternative rock outfit that features TVW writer Andres “Andy” Andrade. Dubbed the “Rock & Roll Picture Show,” this evening will convince your eardrums that it’s the weekend.

more info.

FRIDAY

Always Nothing One Year Anniversary

Orlando creative conglomerate Always Nothing never do anything by the book. On Friday, they turn one! Their birthday party is sure to be a unique combination of art and live music. The appropriately peculiar Moon Jelly will be putting on their spectacular live show — past shows have incorporated elaborate lighting rigs, projections, and neon glasses that fragment light. All of this madness serves as the canvas for the raw artistic talent that is the band’s four musicians. Joining them will be Gainesville producer Euglossine and two NYC atmospheric artists, Cuddle Information and There Are No Thieves. Not all of the night’s info is posted yet, including the location, so keep an eye on the event page.

SATURDAY

Music On Mills

Four stages. Thirty Orlando acts. One charming street. The second annual Music on Mills festival is destined to be one of the biggest events of the year. The unstoppable Jessica Pawli has pulled together an all-Orlando lineup showcasing a myriad (the only appropriate word) of bands, solo artists, and DJs, playing at a few Mills hotspots: BART, St. Matthew’s, Wally’s, and Will’s Pub.Proceeds from the $10 ticket ($15 on Saturday) will help fund public art and safety projects in the Mills 50 District. It’s been interesting watching this event take shape — I even helped select a few of the acts (thanks Jessica for including me!).

Catch Jessica every Friday on WPRK from 4 p.m. to 5 p.m. Every other Friday, I’m on with Mitch Foster from Shows I Go To!

DO NOT MISS: ARK, The New Lows, Common Man, Someday River, Thrift House, and Zoya Zafar.

more info.

Ladies Get Lit

On the same night as Music On Mills, Lil Indies (the bar adjacent to Will’s) is housing Ladies Get Lit, a celebration of Orlando’s literary females, hosted by three Orlando zines: let’s kiss (run by TVW contributor Karina Curto), Phosphene Girl, and Tittie-Thyme. Each will be slinging a new issue of their respective zine while musicians and spoken word artists take turns on the mic.

more info.

 

Odessos Move track review

Odessos – “Move” (track review) \\ ep out 10/23

One cannot have enough of this new Odessos track. It’s like disco went on a road trip to Cali and didn’t stop, save for gas and cigs. “Move” is titled appropriately considering it persists in grabbing your hand and pulling you back out on the floor. A sweet mixture of wavy guitar and groovy bass lies on a bed of smooth, funky drums that keep you comin’ back for the flavor.

As it turns out, “Move” wasn’t the only preview I would be getting of their upcoming EP, Ursus Arctos Arctos. The EP is set to release at Will’s Pub on Nov 8th; however, Richard was gracious enough to offer me a listen to a handful of final mixes. What I experienced was exactly what I was looking for out of a modern band. Their interesting song structures and alternate time signatures diversifies the group of songs without taking them out of their element. Hearing the mixes turns my attention to their upcoming Off The Avenue session on the 17th. The atmosphere this talented band has created should make for a fantastic video.

Long story short, Ursus Arctos Arctos is fucking phenomenal. Get psyched.

Odessos – “Move” (track review) by Graham Johnson

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Boxing At The Zoo - 'BATZ' (ep review)

Boxing At The Zoo – ‘BATZ’ (ep review)

A few months after the release of Daydreamer by The Young Psychedelics, the band has been reduce to only two members. Count your lucky stars that Daniel Ramos isn’t one of them.

Alongside Chase Bauduin’s grand bass playing and fall-in-love-with- me vocals, Andrew Lesmes’s impactful drumming (already stoically seen in local psychedelic-revival band, The Detour), allows for Daniel’s return to the role of charismatic and energy-releasing lead guitarist for his band, Boxing At The Zoo. Fueled by captivating indie pop rock that mixes the emotional depth of early Modest Mouse, the catchy rhythm of Vampire Weekend debut, and the blissful vocals of The Head and the Heart, Boxing At The Zoo self-titled EP (BATZ) strikes a chord of harmony and progression for the Central Florida independent scene.

BATZ opens with “Wanderlust,” a playful tune that drags you in with its brilliant rhythm and friendly indie pop sound. Flowing into “Ms Molly,” Boxing At The Zoo demonstrates some playful riffs — their signature at this point. Remarkably, these two are the most straightforward tracks on the EP.

Leading into “Another Story (Feel So Low),” the dynamic sound of earlier tracks are simply and elegantly shifted into a bouche of elegant lyrics: “Another story/Just another chance to be proven wrong/Just another chance to move along.” Chase’s vocal duet with Daniel provides a milky mixture of sincerity and passion. “Gone,” a song drenched in lyrical depth and an attitude that strives for hopelessness, continues this trend with the lyrics, “No point in dragging distant memories/No, they won’t make me a better person.”

“Time Will Tell” drags you back into the quick and promising indie pop from “Wanderlust” and “Ms Molly.” BATZ closes with another passive-aggressive tune that is filled with as much elegance as any track on this EP: “If you simply tell me you miss me/ I can pretended to care.” Daniel gives us a wink with this solo near the end of this track and wraps us all completely up with: “Oh she loves me!/Yeah she loves me!/ And she knows it!”

Beautiful and drenched with a taste for irony, Boxing At The Zoo presents an enthrallment for independent rock in Central Florida. As Daniel continues to provoke us with realistically romantic lyrics, we can only wait around patiently, for more.

Boxing At The Zoo – ‘BATZ’ (ep review) by Andres “Andy” Andrade 

Living Decent - 'Living Decent' (ep review)

Living Decent – ‘Living Decent’ (ep review)

Fall in Florida is weird. One day, you feel like you’re floating in the middle of a PSL, nuzzled-up watching trees slowly die. The next, that unforgiving bitch summer shows her nasty head like the ex you can’t get rid of. This back-and-forth, bipolar game of love can stretch throughout winter, and can suck the holiday spirit out of old Santy Claus himself. On their debut EP, Living Decent encapsulate this feeling with a release that soundtracks both the cool breeze of fall, and the hot hell of fall. Enjoy.

At first glimpse — or whatever the auditory version of a glimpse is — Living Decent seems like a full on summer EP; it was released back in July and the guitar often sounds like soft swells, running onto warm sand. But on the intro, “Close Enough to Keep You Close,” Victor Alvarez’s voice sparks a sentiment that thrusts me  into the cool isolation of autumn. His ghostly tones engulf the release in a sense of longing — hauntingly abundant on the hook of “Borrowed Bike”: “You feel like home.”

This theme of nostalgia as pain is further exemplified in the song’s video. In it, we watch an old home video, a flashback to a time where the American life was simpler, more pure. Although the instrumentals in their openness create the sensation of freedom, the EP as a whole tries to recapture a lost feeling. “Bad Collections” cries, “Your glowing lights are now receding.” Like a Floridian longing for jacket appropriate weather, Living Decent look at the skeletons in their closet and wish they were still flesh and blood.

Take me back
Back before the day we met
Back before we had any consequence

'So It Goes': An Interview with Wet Nurse | The Vinyl Warhol
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‘So It Goes’: An Interview with Wet Nurse

With their 2012 debut album, Daily Whatever, Wet Nurse became a staple in the Orlando music community. The sweet melodies of the Chaplin twins infected me with some poppy punky virus that forced my body to do the strangest of gyrations. I was hooked. This Friday (9/25), the band is releasing their sophomore album, the equally lax titled, So It Goes. And here’s something you should have expected … Wet Nurse is still fucking good. In celebration of what could easily be the Wet Nurse’s breakout album, I got to talk to one of my favorite local bands about their music. And it was amazingQ Our excellent photographer, Karina Curto, directed a photoshoot with the girls that involved doughnuts. Enjoy.

The Vinyl Warhol: So, Wet Nurse … We got some mimosas, some beer.

Vanessa Brewster: Doughnuts!

TVW: Doughnuts. Mimosas. It’s been a wild ride so far. Like, I feel like I know you guys so well after the last twenty-five minutes or so. But how did you guys all get together? [To the twins] how did you guys meet?

Nina Chaplin: Well … It was about 26 years ago. And we were suckin’ each other’s thumbs in the sonogram.

[laughs]

Susanna Chaplin: She popped out and I followed. It was like, “Oh shit, there’s two of us.”

TVW: Was music something, early on, that you guys were into? Was someone copying someone else?

NC: Well, we both like to sing. That started from an early age. We’d sing together. And it wasn’t until we were like 12 or 13; we were like, “Let’s start a band!”

'So It Goes': An Interview with Wet Nurse | The Vinyl Warhol
photo by Karina Curto

TVW: What was your first band called?

NC: We didn’t have a name. Did we have a name? We didn’t have a name. We didn’t really practice. We had like two songs.

TVW: That sounds like every band I’ve been in. So Baile, how did you get into the band? I remember, I went to a Wet Nurse show and I was like, “Who is this fourth person?”

Baile Yeager: Nina and I were in a band a while ago called Tit Sweat … One night we were at Wally’s, and Suzie brought it up. She was like, “We heard you guys playing and I think we need another guitar player.”

SC: Yeah, we were always playing around with the idea of another guitar player. [Nina] would go into solo and [the song] would sound flat. It was missing something, an extra balance. We obviously wanted it to be a girl to keep the dynamic.

TVW: Going from Daily Whatever to So It Goes was the recording process different? I imagine it was all pretty new at first.

NC: We did our EP before the first one. We just recorded that in our house. When we gathered more songs, we went into the studio and knocked it out in like … two days, maybe three.

TVW: Where was Daily Whatever recorded?

NC: At this radio station in Tampa, called WNMF … We did a few live tracks for this guy, Allister. He opened it up after hours and we could stay as long as we wanted to.

TVW: Going in for the second one, was it easier?

NC: It was still a lot of work.

VB: It was a little easier because he knew our process already.

BY: [Allister] is the best. He’s patient. Didn’t rush us and lets us take smoke breaks whenever we wanted.

TVW: Just so you know, I have Daily Whatever on vinyl and it’s so fucking good; I listen to it all the time. So, I was pretty scared going into [So It Goes] that it wasn’t going to be as good.

SC: Yeah, we were also scared.

TVW: But I’ve noticed that it’s a little more straightforward. It’s not as pop-y. The music seems to be going for a little more of that punk edge. Was [the addition of] Baile also an influence on that shift?

NC: It definitely changed the dynamic, gave us more room to explore. Maybe a little more mature sound rather than just silly pop punk.

SC: We definitely have some weird, more 90’s influences on this one.

VB: That’s more from like touring and being around different music.

NC: We generally get the same response: “Wow that’s good.”

[laughs]

TVW: I wanted to talk about “Belly Hurts” for a second. Because I think that’s accidentally become your calling card of sorts. I wanted to ask you how you came up with that song. It really sounds like one of those songs that came out of thin air.

NC: Actually, that song is a funny story. Me and [Susanna] wrote that a long time ago, before we started the band. It was just this funny, silly thing. Just singing stupid songs like, “Oh, why would your belly hurt?” Just like, “Oh, I ate crappy food” or sometimes when you’re hungover or didn’t get enough sleep or like, really missing a loved one. Anxious or something. We wrote that little part and never introduced it to the band. It was actually Baile.

BY: I heard them playing it and that harmony. I heard that first harmony and I was like, “Um … excuse me.” [laughs] “What the fuck!?”

VB: It was just that first part for a long time.

BY: I was just like, “That needs to be a fucking song.”

SC: So we worked on it a little bit and it ended up being one of the biggest hits of our career.

VB: It’s pretty cool that people sing it and it’s not even out.

TVW: And when I see you playing with bands like False Punk, whose hooks are that they don’t have any hooks, you guys play “Belly Hurts” and everyone is singing it, all these punks who were just throwing themselves at each other.

VB: We started though, playing hardcore shows … I like those shows.

TVW: When did you guys start?

NC: 2010. We had a different drummer around that time, our roommate Jordan. He started because we just wanted to have fun and play shows with our friends. And then we played like two or three shows, and he skipped town for like, months. We had shows and were like, “Shit!” So, we held auditions and [Vanessa] came over and got really stoned. We gave her the songs; we had like four or five songs. And she killed it!

VB: I thought I bombed it because I was so stoney bologna.

TVW: Are you guys the kind of those bands that writes 100 songs and picks the best 12 for the records?

VB: No. We wrote exactly how many are on the record. We’re not like prolific …

NC: JESUS!

SC: What?!

VB: Oh!

BY: It’s a really big bug. It’s a palmetto.

NC: We don’t like bugs!

BY: Wet Nurse does not like bugs.

SC: We hate them!

TVW: Do we want to move?

NC: It’s a loud motherfucker!

TVW: Should I kill it? Is that okay?

BY: Use your notes.

[whack!]

SC: He’s in the fanny [pack]!

NC: No! Get out of my fanny. He gone … oh no, he back.

[whack! whack! whack!] the bug is dead.

TVW: OK. I don’t fuck with bugs either. That’s going to be fun to listen back on.

VB: Whack! Whack!

NC: Loud motherfucker!

VB: What were we talking about?

TVW: We were talking about music, I think.

[laughs]

See Wet Nurse when they destroy to whatever dumb town you live in! Tour dates here!

photo by Karina Curto
photo by Karina Curto