Timothy Eerie Interview

‘A Dreidel Soaked in Acid’: Going to Space with Timothy Eerie

Sweater Fest 2015 is next Saturday! This year, the annual Christmas kerfuffle features a collection of talent where the only common thread between bands is the side effect of spastic dancing. One of those bands is psychedelic space pixies, Timothy Eerie. Dave Hanson (the Sweater Fest Santa himself!) spoke with the vocalist/guitarist Casey Lerman to see whether he’s been naughty or nice. The results: a dreidel soaked in acid. Enjoy.

For more info on all of the Sweater Fest happenings, check the FB event page, and read more interviews with the band’s at Happy Camper Booking.

How long has Timothy Eerie been a band?

We all starting putting our heads together this past summer, so Timothy Eerie has been a physical band for less than a year now. I came up with the idea to start writing these songs years ago. So in concept, Timothy Eerie has been in the making for some time.

How does the band change about show to show? I’ve only seen y’all twice but it was a different lineup both times.

This band is more of a collaborative art collective. We don’t have a solid lineup besides myself and my drummer, Mike Scitney. Everyone that plays with Timothy Eerie has other projects, so there are times that certain people will be booked on the days of our shows, and then we bring new characters into the picture. I like it. Each change-up brings a new flavor to the songs, so the set list goes through these reincarnations. It keeps it interesting for us and for the audience. 

Are you guys obsessed with LSD or was that just too good of a band name to pass up?

I wouldn’t call in an obsession, but it is an inspiration. I love it. The LSD state of mind is more real than anything in this external reality. It goes hand in hand with visionary art and music. Plus, it’s very therapeutic. I literally need to take it every so often to stay balanced. Going insane keeps me sane.

You guys have a keen focus on psychedelia — what defines this idea to you and at what point in creating a song do you feel like you have begun to achieve that? How does that idea play into your live performance versus your recordings?

Our music isn’t psychedelic in the traditional sense, but the songs are very influenced by  60’s and 70’s music and counterculture. That scene was fueled by the psychedelic experience, so it leaks into what we do. Our recordings are a little more straight forward than our live show. We go to space when we play live. Keeping it weird is something that we’re working on. And as time goes on, I believe our sound will find a more for a spiritual path rather than just psychedelia. 

Any of you guys have any weird christmas traditions?

My weirdest Christmas tradition is celebration Chanukah (*cue studio laugh).

What are you looking forward to most about Sweater Fest?

Honestly, I’m most excited to see the other bands do their thing. This will be our first time attending Sweater Fest, and the lineup is so tasty.

What’s in the works for Timothy Eerie?

We have so much in the works. We’re recording our EP right now. The working title is Heterochromia. We just got a band van and plan on taking her all around Florida in early February. We’re playing our first festival next year called Little Econ Love Fest at Maddox Ranch. Our art director, Sapphire Servellon aka Artardvark, is collaborating with a new projection mapping company, called Hybrid Eyes Visualizations, to bring some really weird visuals to the live shows. We’re releasing a visual art series called ‘Don’t think Broadcast’ early next year too. 

Stuyedeyed – ‘Cursed’

Back in March, we did a show/fundraiser called WE ARE ANIMALS. Right after the show was announced, RJ from Witch Kings/The Welzeins told me he knew a touring-band that was looking for a gig in Orlando. So, he sent me their album. Stuyedeyed’s fuzz-stained psychedelia felt like taking a lava lamp to the face. And at the show, they kept us out late with the most energetic set that’s ever taken place at 4AM. These Brooklynites have just released a new three song EP, Cursed. Just as I’ve gotten the last of the glass out of my gums, they hit me again. Enjoy.

Stuyedeyed (Brooklyn, NY ) added to WE ARE ANIMALS

If you’ve been boycotting us over the last few weeks, or just never liked us to begin with, then WE ARE ANIMALS probably means nothing to you. And that’s fine. I’m not really a fan of this site’s output either. But, WE ARE ANIMALS is our first show (3/21 @ The Space), featuring Witch Kings, Tiger Fawn, Pasty Cline, Pathos, Pathos and – just added – Brooklyn psychedelic savants, Stuyedeyed. If you’d like to become a more informed consumer, read more into WE ARE ANIMALS and RSVP. Enjoy.

It’s a great surprise to have Stuyedeyed on board with this show. They’re coming into Orlando a little sooner than they expected – they have another show on 3/22 – and were looking for a place to play. So, take a minute and melt into the lava-esque sounds flowing through their debut album Birth, and come see them close out The Space. I say the more the merrier. What do you think?

Casual Conversation: Gettin’ Creepy with The Casket Girls

Tonight’s the night. If you’re still in the dark, The Casket Girls are playing in a few hours @ Will’s Pub. There’s still time to get your tickets if you weren’t as lucky as Chris Woodyard, winner of the ticket contest. In preparation for the show, I was lucky enough to get to ask The Casket Girls a few questions. Stay tuned for another interview with The Stargazer Lilies. Enjoy.

“We would offer reconciliatory truce and suggest the formation of a super group called ‘Greene eggs and HAIM.'”

How was SXSW? Any crazy stories? Did you get to see any performances while in Texas?

“SXSW was yes, crazy. We actually only saw Graveface bands as our schedules were pretty tied up, but all the Graveface bands were of course, incredible. Creepoid and Haley Bonar were some highlights. We had an amazing time recording our Daytrotter session, and the shows were all pretty epic. Even the ones with terrible sound and no time to breathe… It’s all a part of the madness.”

(Phaedra and Elsa Greene) Growing up, were you always collaborating together? Was there ever a time when you were in different bands or listening to opposing styles of music?

“Yes, we have always collaborated to some extent on everything we do, as we seem to share a mind to some degree, however this is our first time playing music. We have of course “played” together tons growing up with vivid imaginations. Our taste has always been pretty similar, however I have always been in love with GNR, and Fay isn’t having it.”

(Phaedra and Elsa) Having come from the same backgrounds (presumably same parents, same hometown, same high schools), how do you think your personalities and what you took from those shared experiences differ?

“We are of the mind of nature over nurture, therefor our differences are inherent and come from within us.”

(Phaedra and Elsa) You wrote your last release in a non-traditional way (the girls wrote the entire album during an acid trip)? How do you think doing so changed your writing? Was there something dug up that inspired the lyrics?

We have been experimenting with automatic writing and using mostly images from our dreams writing journals. That has taught us that some of the most poignant ideas come from the subconscious mind, and even the collective unconsciousness.

(Phaedra and Elsa) What is the dynamic like when writing together? Do fights ever break out over lyrics and melodies, or is it harmonious?

“We never fight. We do nothing but embrace and nurture each other’s thoughts, as we almost consider them our own. We also practice using all ideas in some way, whether is be a back up part or harmony, it has a place in our world.”

(Ryan Graveface) How does your musical ideas, in-studio and touring, differ from Phaedra and Elsa’s? What does each party bring to the table?

“It differs because I write the music and the girls write the lyrics and vocal melodies. I think this is why we work so well together, as we are coming from completely different places, yet in the end everything makes psychic sense.”

(Phaedra and Elsa) How do you think you would do in a street fight against the Haim sisters?

“We are lovers, not fighters. We would offer reconciliatory truce and suggest the formation of a super group called “Greene eggs and HAIM.””

FREE TIX CONTEST! “Graveface Roadshow” (feat. The Casket Girls) Friday @ Will’s Pub

Holy shit, this is exciting! I’m so EXCITED! AREN’T YOU EXCITED FOR THE THING I HAVEN’T TOLD YOU ABOUT?!?! okay. So here’s the thing. I was contacted by Graveface Records, and they asked me to help them promote the “Graveface Roadshow” this Friday @ Will’s Pub. The show features Graveface Records’ artists: The Casket Girls (featuring Ryan Graveface from Black Moth Super Rainbow), The Stargazer Lilies, and Dreamend. Tickets are $10, but if you go to The Vinyl Warhol Facebook Page you can enter a contest to win a free pair of your tickets! The contest ends tomorrow, so be sure not to dawdle. OMG FREE SHIT! Want to know what’s in store for Friday? Keep reading. Enjoy.

ENTER THE TICKET GIVEAWAY ON FACEBOOK! DON’T YOU FUCK THIS UP FOR ME!

The Casket Girls

Can a band name contain the word “Girls” if one of their members is a guy? Why not!? Savannah-based trio, The Casket Girls is made up of sisters Phaedra and Elsa Greene, teamed with Ryan Graveface (Graveface Records, Black Moth Super Rainbow, Dreamend). The band formed in 2012 and quickly put out their debut-album Sleepingwalking. Only last month, The Casket Girls second full-length True Love Kills the Fairy Tale was unleashed into an unsuspecting world. A combination of avant-garde style psych-rock and hook-filled indie pop, the album is chocked full of tight melodies, sultry vocals, and shimmery tones. Imagine an LSD-fueled world rich with color, and you’ve reached The Casket Girls’ reality. 


The Stargazer Lilies

The Stargazer Lilies’s music casts a dark ambient shadow over all it touches. Members John Cep and Kim Field’s previous act, Soundpool is striped to it’s most bare essentials, creating what the band themselves describes as “no bullshit sunshine haze.” Their debut-album We Are The Dreamers was released last October, with reviews raving their ambient minimalist direction. K Field’s vocals are a light mist that envelope the listener with coupled feelings of sorrow and happiness, and their sounds conjure both your brightest fantasies and your darkest nightmares.

Dreamend

Dreamend is a solo venture by Ryan Graveface featuring a revolving door of freaks and weirdos (I don’t actually know them personally, they could be lovely people). Their sound is a mixture of spacey psych-rock and acoustic folk music. Its been a few years since their last release, but they have teased at new music coming this year.