Someday River Day Changer single review live photos

Someday River – “Day Changer” (single review + live photos)

I love to paint too. Whenever I paint, it’s not about anything. It’s just about color. You know, working with color and blending. I rarely clean my brush. I just continuously mix colors without cleaning. 

This is how you describe Someday River. You can’t fit them within the confines of a rigorously structured genre. Believe me! I’ve heard people try. I’ve tried. You can’t do it. You sound like an upset three-year-old, fumbling your words. The apt portrait above was  Someday River’s Greyson Charnock talking to me about painting. It was the moment where I really understood Someday River’s bright colors.

“Day Changer” is the first single from Someday River’s upcoming Sleeping Sideways EP, out May 13. One listen reveals classic Someday River — meaning you’ve never heard anything quite like it. The spacey head-nodding is there. Greyson’s echoed vocals reverberate like tuning forks in the mist. A three piece is elevated to moon colony size. 

The free-floating vocals and guitar are pulled in by the trio’s tight rhythm section, Kyle Fournier and Sean Boyle. You’d think anything that went along with those expressive elements would be masked. Instead, Kyle’s bass lines push to the front with Greyson’s guitar, right where they belong. A snappy beat adds weight. These three voices perfectly intertwine and we have one cohesive song, not three separate parts. The mission is clear: make humanity dance like aliens.

“Hurry up and wait for it,” a phrase any artist, musical or not, is familiar with. We are constantly told to improve, to grow. And for most of us, this is what we want to do. But when outside forces restrict you from development — whether it be financial stability, self-satisfaction, or other things “functioning adults” do — it’s incredibly frustrating. “Day Changer” is Someday River taking matters into their own hands.

I try not to get stuck on the style of the music … It doesn’t matter if it’s the same genre, but I try to hold myself to the same level as bands I respect. I don’t want to be like, “I would listen to this all day long, but I wouldn’t listen to my shit.”

An excerpt from “[Someday River]: Linear Abstraction & Christmas Sweaters”

If you’re in Orlando, Someday River’s Sleeping Sideways EP release show is on May 13. I saw them at House of Blues a couple of weeks of back. Enjoy.

Someday River Day Changer single review live photos

Someday River Day Changer single review live photos

Someday River Day Changer single review live photos

Someday River Day Changer single review live photos

Someday River Day Changer single review live photos

Someday River Day Changer single review live photos

Someday River Day Changer single review live photos

Boxing At The Zoo - 'BATZ' (ep review)

Boxing At The Zoo – ‘BATZ’ (ep review)

A few months after the release of Daydreamer by The Young Psychedelics, the band has been reduce to only two members. Count your lucky stars that Daniel Ramos isn’t one of them.

Alongside Chase Bauduin’s grand bass playing and fall-in-love-with- me vocals, Andrew Lesmes’s impactful drumming (already stoically seen in local psychedelic-revival band, The Detour), allows for Daniel’s return to the role of charismatic and energy-releasing lead guitarist for his band, Boxing At The Zoo. Fueled by captivating indie pop rock that mixes the emotional depth of early Modest Mouse, the catchy rhythm of Vampire Weekend debut, and the blissful vocals of The Head and the Heart, Boxing At The Zoo self-titled EP (BATZ) strikes a chord of harmony and progression for the Central Florida independent scene.

BATZ opens with “Wanderlust,” a playful tune that drags you in with its brilliant rhythm and friendly indie pop sound. Flowing into “Ms Molly,” Boxing At The Zoo demonstrates some playful riffs — their signature at this point. Remarkably, these two are the most straightforward tracks on the EP.

Leading into “Another Story (Feel So Low),” the dynamic sound of earlier tracks are simply and elegantly shifted into a bouche of elegant lyrics: “Another story/Just another chance to be proven wrong/Just another chance to move along.” Chase’s vocal duet with Daniel provides a milky mixture of sincerity and passion. “Gone,” a song drenched in lyrical depth and an attitude that strives for hopelessness, continues this trend with the lyrics, “No point in dragging distant memories/No, they won’t make me a better person.”

“Time Will Tell” drags you back into the quick and promising indie pop from “Wanderlust” and “Ms Molly.” BATZ closes with another passive-aggressive tune that is filled with as much elegance as any track on this EP: “If you simply tell me you miss me/ I can pretended to care.” Daniel gives us a wink with this solo near the end of this track and wraps us all completely up with: “Oh she loves me!/Yeah she loves me!/ And she knows it!”

Beautiful and drenched with a taste for irony, Boxing At The Zoo presents an enthrallment for independent rock in Central Florida. As Daniel continues to provoke us with realistically romantic lyrics, we can only wait around patiently, for more.

Boxing At The Zoo – ‘BATZ’ (ep review) by Andres “Andy” Andrade 

Dromes – ‘Deep Thoughts’ (ep review)

Dromes is the moniker of Orlando vocalist, DJ, producer, and multi-instrumentalist, Chandler Strang. Over the past few months, he’s released a handful of remixes and original tracks, some purely instrumental, and some featuring his own voice or a number guest vocalists. Now, Dromes is gathering those tracks for his debut EP, Deep Thoughts. Enjoy.

Deep Thoughts is not a predictable listen. It’s filled with differing sounds, changes in tone, and unfamiliar voices. And with each new track, Dromes pulls elements from different parts of the musical spectrum. “Within, Without,” the EP’s opener, is filled with these airy synth lines that evoke Washed Out. On the very next track, “I Don’t Hate You,” Dromes lulls over these acoustic guitar melodies that hearken back to early early-to-mid-2000’s R&B slow jams – see Usher’s “U Got It Bad” and Justin Timberlake’s “What Goes Around… Comes Around.” He again switches things up on the pulsing “Norwegian Gem,” which incorporates vibrant cymbals that really add color to the song.

These jumps in style are what make Deep Thoughts such a fun ride. After repeated listens, I began to see Dromes as this guru of sound, continuously changing hats and looking damn good in every single one. But, he’s not alone. The features Dromes brings on Deep Thoughts also help shape the changing musical landscape. The vocal samples from Orlando pop artist Priest on “Only One” haunt the instrumental, turning the song into somewhat of a Crystal Castles’ stronghold. Then on “Relapse,” Dromes and Delia Albert, vocalist from Gainesville duo PALMEDO, craft an infectious, sugar-coated, dance-inducing pop tune. I could go on about the greatness of Mr. 3’s slick verse on the EP’s closer – there’s some great lines about Zubats in caves and meeting girls on Tinder – but I think I’ve made my point. I like this.

“Mr. 3 and Dromes got the shit to make your smoothie melt.”

FAV TRACKS: “If It’s Alright,” “Norwegian Gem,” “Relapse”