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No Pulp w/ ORL Promoters Ugly Orange

In June 2016, Orlando music promoters Ugly Orange hosted their first event, a tour kick off for Lakeland’s Swept with support from The Knick Knacks (R.I.P.), Dumberbunnies, and The Zigs. Even before its start, each of UO’s three heads were already seasoned veterans in the Orlando music scene. Nicole Dvorak cut her booking teeth playing in numerous local bands, most notably Transcendental Telecom. Hannah Fregger had been a key member of monthly dance night Body Talk since its inception. And Kaley Honeycutt was performing with/booked shows for her synth pop trio Island Science and crafting amazing artwork for local bands and shows.

Together, Ugly Orange quickly became a brand boosting local and touring music, booking an average of two shows a month and collaborating with the likes of Always Nothing and yes, The Vinyl Warhol. They’ve also expanded beyond events, releasing a series of live session videos. I kicked it with two of The Ugly Oranges—Kaley has since relocated to Boston to be a rockstar in BABY—to see why they’re so damn cool. Enjoy.

Upcoming Events:

6/1: Crumb, Lance Bangs, The Welzeins, & Room Thirteen at Henao Contemporary Center

6/23: No Thank You, Brave Face, Spirit Maps at Henao Contemporary Center


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matthew warhol: I wanted to start with asking my good friends in the Orange community, how did you get together?

Nicole Dvorak: Tell him about, “Where is this bitch?”

Hannah Fregger: I was booking shows and helping manage Body Talk at the time. I booked Island Science for a Body Talk and Kaley and I kept in touch after that. After I was asked to leave Body Talk, I was feeling really sad, and saw that they posted a Facebook Status saying that they wanted to start doing shows that were powered by girls. They asked me to come over to Nicole’s house, and I’m perpetually late.

matthew warhol: You were late to this interview. And it was at your house.

Hannah Fregger: I was like seven minutes late, and I’m walking up to the door and hear Nicole go, “Alright, where is this bitch?!” And I knock on the door and everyone gets quiet. I’m like, “I’m right here.” We sat down and talked about music we liked and what we thought we wanted to do; we had our dreams in one little basket and they seemed to align. Here we are.

matthew warhol: What do you think the importance of it being female-powered is?

Nicole Dvorak: Oh, that’s a Hannah question. I didn’t even think about it being female. I’ve never even had that in the back of mind.

matthew warhol: But you’ve been in bands and stuff where you’re the only girl.

Hannah Fregger: At the same time, you’ve literally said that you’ve been asked to be in bands because your profile picture is you with a bass. This is an entirely sexist industry.

Nicole Dvorak: I should be promoting that fact.

matthew warhol: And you are, by default, just doing what you do.

Hannah Fregger: And at that time, the only people who were booking shows, besides Tierney, were a bunch of dudes. And they were putting on other dudes, which is fine, but there aren’t a lot of women. It’s a very male-dominated industry. People come up to us and say that’s one of the things they like most about our shows. And for me at least, I think girls are more visual. We want everything to look cool.

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matthew warhol: And that’s something that sets your shows apart. I think all good shows create a night, an atmosphere, something people are going to remember. How do you do that?

Hannah Fregger: We try to make things different each time.

Nicole Dvorak: I never want to put on a show of just locals. I want to have some fresh faces, and we’ve never booked a show without an out-of-town band as our starting point. We start with “Oh, we’re really excited about this band that hit us up,” and we go from there.

Hannah Fregger: Also, there aren’t a lot of venues to work with, and when that happens everything gets stale really fast. So you’re going to the Henao Center or Spacebar or Will’s, but I don’t want it to ever feel like you’re in those places. I want you to feel like you’re at an Ugly Orange show. We’ve never done the same thing twice. We reuse local talent but try to make sure everything is different on the inside, a little gimmick going on. We had macaroni n cheese one time.

matthew warhol: I’d say immersion hit its highest peak so far at the last show at the Henao.

Nicole Dvorak: Yeah, well that one was all Hannah Glogower.

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matthew warhol: She did an excellent job. With a space like that, it’s so big. I feel like to create an environment, you have to go all out.

Nicole Dvorak: But it’s also such a low-key, low pressure place, I don’t feel like I need to fill the space to make it a successful night. Will’s Pub, I feel like I need to bring in people.

Hannah Fregger: You can definitely feel it at Will’s if there aren’t a lot of people. And at the gallery, they have the big room where all the art is, so I think that takes the pressure because there is already some focal point. And the back room is bare bone, it’s guts like The Space used to be. Even if there’s only five people in there, you can still create really cool environments. That’s what Hannah did. She had one little idea as a jumping point, and she created the outdoor installation that was gorgeous.

matthew warhol: What’s been the most flattering moment so far?

Hannah Fregger: Freakin’ Cassie Ramone, dude. Oh my God, TONSTARTSBANDHT that’s crazy! I think, recently, a lot of people have been reaching out to us, which is crazy.

matthew warhol: What show have you been most proud of?

Hannah Fregger: I think that the coolest thing we’ve done so far is the one at the gallery.

Nicole Dvorak: The most recent one?

Hannah Fregger: Yeah. The Ace Metric show was super fun too, but I felt really stressed that night.

Nicole Dvorak: I feel completely the opposite. I was so stressed during the show at the gallery.

matthew warhol: Why?

Hannah Fregger: We’ve never worked with people with guarantees before. We never make a profit.

Nicole Dvorak: Also, Henao is still in its beginning stages. They don’t have a sound guy. We’re still figuring it out there.

Hannah Fregger: And that’s one of those things where I have no idea. I let Nicole do that.

read our last interview

Follow Ugly Orange: Facebook / Instagram

Follow The Vinyl Warhol: Facebook / Instagram / Twitter

matthew warhol: Nicole, I remember we were talking at the Ace Metric show that that was one of your favorite moments, getting to do something at a bike shop.

Nicole Dvorak: Oh God, yeah.

matthew warhol: As someone who loves Orlando, seeing a local business, local music, and a local booker coming together…

Nicole Dvorak: That’s what really did it for me. I’m trying to bring everybody up with me—and she feels the same way. Michael at the bike shop has become a really dear friend of mine. And when we bring Hannah Glogower on board and seeing them profit off a show, that’s the rewarding part for me.

Hannah Fregger: There’s so much mutual respect within the community. Especially with The Vinyl Warhol, if there’s ever someone that reaches out to me that I think is more up your alley, I’m going to send it to you, same thing with Harryson and SR50. They have a grasp on different genres.

Nicole Dvorak: Also, shout out Hannah Spector, one of my favorite artists in town. She has had work at like three shows and has been a huge help.

Hannah Fregger: Always reliable, everything always looks so good.

matthew warhol: To what you said about everyone coming together, something I’ve said many times is that, because we’re so much smaller than a city like New York, to have the impact of a big city everyone needs to work together. That wasn’t really a question, but you want to agree or rebuke it, go ahead.

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Nicole Dvorak: Yes and no, I go to New York and they have their own little cliques and get caught up going to the same shows. I think it’s cool that you do stuff that brings different communities together, and I want to definitely do that too.

Hannah Fregger: I think what sets Orlando a part, even from cities like St. Petersburg or Tallahassee, is that the city itself doesn’t support its alternative community. That’s why all the good stuff dies, The Peacock Room, The Space. If the city were backing us, if we had more support, we could have a really strong community. It’s a big small town. Sometimes I step outside of my bubble, and am amazed. Like, the ska scene is alive in Orlando!

Nicole Dvorak: That’s why the death of Spacebar and The Space is so detrimental.

matthew warhol: It needs to grow, more and more venues. Not just replacing the one that dies.

Nicole Dvorak: It can’t be like that.

Hannah Fregger: We had A Place Gallery around for a year. The city didn’t support them as an art gallery so they had to stop. If there was more support and funding from bigger community members, it would be able to actually create a culture that could stay. That’s why everyone leaves because nothing good can stay here. You reach your ceiling and you have to bolt.

matthew warhol: What else would you improve?

Nicole Dvorak: The whole point of why we do this is to get artists that we like to come down here and see how cool it is. Hannah and I take care of them every time. She makes the breakfast in the morning. We already have artists coming back that are from Colorado and Iowa.

Hannah Fregger: Karen Meat is coming back. Hypoluxo is coming back.

Nicole Dvorak: Hopefully, they’re spreading the word for people to come down.

Hannah Fregger: We just want to create a place where people feel comfortable and safe. We don’t mind if only 15 people come out to a show as long as you had the best night, ya know?

matthew warhol: But that doesn’t really happen anymore for you guys.

Hannah Fregger: Not for a while, but now it’s going to happen. You’re jinxing us.

matthew warhol: So it won’t, what’s next on the horizon?

Hannah Fregger: I think especially because this was our first year, we weren’t saying no to much. I think we’ve figured our shit out now.

Nicole Dvorak: Personally, I like the video aspect. And she’s really good at interviews.

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Hannah Fregger: I want it to be more of an homage to different music publications… and collectives too. Like Hardly Art and Panache Booking, they all work together and make sure that not only that they’re doing well, but that everyone else is supported. We want to be that for Orlando. Hopefully, we can keep being a jumping off point for local talent and touring talent, making lasting connections.

Nicole Dvorak: And establish more of an online aspect, that’s important to me.

matthew warhol: What shows are coming up?

Hannah Fregger: On June 1, we have Crumb, Lance Bangs, Room Thirteen—who I’m super excited to have back from New Orleans—and, our friends, The Welzeins. It’s going to be a very cool show for The Welzeins because they are no longer a two-piece.

matthew warhol: I heard about that. They’ve spent like the last five years as a two-piece.

Hannah Fregger: It’s going to give them a really big sound. Their sound is big to begin with; RJ’s amps are bigger than him.

Jon Bartee [who’s been sitting quietly watching us talk]: They’ve practicing as a three piece for like two or three months now.

matthew warhol: That’s so good… am I interviewing you?

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[laughs]

matthew warhol: I’m just kidding.

Nicole Dvorak: That was so [clap] fucking [clap] good [clap] Matt.

matthew warhol: Any other solid dates booked?

Hannah Fregger: We have Tall Juan coming on July 5. He just played both weekends at Coachella and is on BUFU Records.

matthew warhol: Where’s that?

Hannah Fregger: It’s going to be at Deadly Sins Brewery. And then we have No Thank You on June 23rd with Brave Face.

Nicole Dvorak: And Frank Ocean is coming in July…

Hannah Fregger: …July 37th. He’s only going to play “Chanel” in different languages…

Nicole Dvorak: …to us two. Nobody else is invited. I’m so sorry.

Hannah Fregger: You know what I think we should do? I’m serious about this. Petition for Jack Black to come and play a show as Mr. Schneebly,.

matthew warhol: Ew.

Nicole Dvorak: For some reason I thought you meant Jack White.

matthew warhol: Petition Jack White to come play as Jack Black as Mr. Schnebly.

Nicole Dvorak: Next question.

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matthew warhol: Which School of Rock character are you most like?

Hannah Fregger: I’m Summer.

Nicole Dvorak: Dude, I’m Ned Schneebly, dude. Well, I’m Dewey Finn pretending to be Ned Schneebly,.

matthew warhol: Who am I?

Hannah Fregger: um… Billy.

[laughs]

matthew warhol: Is that the guitar player?

Hannah Fregger: No, that’s the fashion designer.

matthew warhol: Come on?!

Nicole Dvorak: “You’re tacky and I hate you.”

matthew warhol: You are tacky and I do hate you, Nicole.

read our last interview

Follow Ugly Orange: Facebook / Instagram

Follow The Vinyl Warhol: Facebook / Instagram / Twitter

Ugly Orange The Vinyl Warhol Spacebar

TVW + UO bring together BKLYN + ORL this Saturday at Spacebar

I can’t sing enough praise about Orlando bookers Ugly Orange. In less than a year, the trio of Nicole Dvorak, Hannah Fregger, and Kaley Honeycutt have built a brand that has elevated our creative community and the up-and-coming bands/musicians in it. Additionally, they’ve attracted touring acts from throughout the country to come play in Florida’s cultural hub. So when these ORL gems came to lil ol’ Warhol saying that we should do show together with two rising Brooklyn bands, I, I … I teared up a bit. The collaboration comes together this Saturday at Spacebar. Not only do you get three great bands, but everyone through the door will be gifted with an orange-themed mini zine. Enjoy.

Featured Image by Kaley Honeycutt.

Hypoluxo (BKLYN)

Did you get sand in my Joy Division? I’ve never been to the beaches in NYC, but I can only imagine that Hypoluxo sounds like an overcast, NYC beach day feels. This foursome just dropped their debut album If Language through Broken Circles, premiering on UK music blog GoldFlakePaint. The low, distressed voice of Samuel Cogen gives the release a personal feel; I lean in to hear his sadness over the beach gloom.

Wild Pink (BKLYN)

Listening to Wild Pink’s third EP 4 Songs — premiered last week on Stereogum — one gets a brief exploration through the band’s pallet. “4th of July” starts the album on a solemn, acoustic note, pointing in the same direction throughout. The next song starts with a little more vitality and builds with thumbing drums into a crashing, mid-tempo anthem. But by the end of “Forlim Chop” the Tiny Engines’s trio reach new levels of fuzz-fueled aggression.

RV (ORL)

In a very brief amount of time, RV built up quite the buzz in the Orlando music community. They’ve shared some great bills at Spacebar and Uncle Lou’s, and were both Ugly Orange and The Vinyl Warhol’s first pick to share the night with the bands above. I was convinced after hearing their impressive three-track demo, the only music RV has released up to this point. The electric drums paired with Mac DeMarco slacker guitar and poppy melodies are an enjoyable listen to anyone with post-hurricane blues.

RSVP 2 Ugly Orange X The Vinyl Warhol Present: Hypoluxo, Wild Pink & RV!

TODAY: The Vinyl Warhol Zine Exhibition @ Market On South (4/24/16)

ICYMI, The Vinyl Warhol isn’t only an Orlando-centric music blog; it’s also a zine. To date, we’ve released three zines, one of which we held a release show for at Will’s. Well that was all warm-up. Now we’re getting serious, quarterly themed zines with works centered around that issue’s title/theme. Included will be essays, photo series, illustrations, collages, poems, and whatever other weird stuff we/you can come up with. Issue one is TODAY

We’re also hosting events that coincide with each release. The first is a Sunday afternoon exhibition at vegan eatery, Market On South, April 24 from 4:00–6:30 p.m. The exhibition will serve as an interactive expansion of the works within the zine, guiding visitors around the gallery. You’ll learn more about the artist and how each work relates to TODAY. Think of the zine as an art gallery’s walls and the exhibition as a tool to generate discussion and thought on said works. 

>>>>>>FACBOOK EVENT<<<<<<

If you’d like to reserve your zine/spot at this limited release, you can purchase one ($5) through either PayPal or Snapcash and pick it up at the event. People who do will receive two completely unique event posters.

TODAY will also feature performances by Orlando musicians, Zoya Zafar and Fast Preacher. Music starts at 4:30.

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Shows We Went To (SIGT Benefit Art Show): Wednesday @ Olde 64

On Friday, November 13, 2015, millions of people thought the world might be ending. And for the people affected by the senseless attacks of terror in Paris, it did. I was particularly shaken by the news that a music venue had been a target, as I probably would have known someone at the Eagles of Death Metal show that night — in fact, I could’ve been there myself.

But let’s not just think about those people, let’s help them. Fellow Orlando music publication Shows I Go To are hosting a charity art show where proceeds from all art sales go to Secours Populaire, a French non-profit that are aiding the families of the deceased. On sale will be select photos from SIGT’s year in concerts. You can also donate money at the door.

Ocala folk boys The States will be playing a set, and DJ Dizzlephunk will spin all night long. Additional info can be found at the Facebook Event Page.

I looked through the 150 different photos being sold and picked a handful that really struck me. This is just the tip of the iceberg, so come down to Olde 64 to see all of the amazing concert photos (watermark free) and help those in need. Enjoy.

TVW Zine Release Show | Thursday, 9/3/2015 | Will’s Pub | $5

In June we released our first zine, a compilation of photos and memories from our tour dairy with Me Chinese. This was originally intended to be a one-off. But, everyone at ZINE FEST was so encouraging, we couldn’t just stop. So with the support of a bunch of really talented Orlando artists, zine two is on the way. And after of the amazing time we had at our first show, WE ARE ANIMALS, we’ve decided to release the zine at a party with all our friends.

The Vinyl Warhol is an extension of the Orlando arts community, not just the music community, and we’re doing something a little different. We’re making a sandwich. Three bands will serve as the hearty bread, with spoken word in between slices as the pb & j in your ears. Orlando’s finest zines (ours is mediocre in comparison) will be set up like fine potato salad to feed your brain more syntax. Doors are at 8:30, music starts at 9:30 p.m. Enjoy your meal, menu below!

Huge thanks to Orlando musician/graphic artist, Cory Young, for our poster. If you see it around, steal it. 

MUSIC

The Knick-Knacks

The Knick-Knacks came to me via my friends in Pathos, Pathos at 3:30 a.m., in between my botched front flips into the band’s shared pool. The much more coordinated band members of Pathos2 praised the Melbourne-based garagesters’ live chops and catchy melodies. Coincidentally, one of their songs is called “CannonBall.”

yogurt smoothness

Almost two years ago — yes, we’ve been doing this shit that long — I wrote the twelfth post to appeared this blog, “Hometown Heroes: yogurt smoothness.” Baby writer, Matthew Weller, said, “The two create a wall of sound, punching you in the chest, demanding lunch money.” This was actually the first time I wrote about an Orlando band. Now, approximately 250 posts later, they’re playing our second show. Talk about “full circle.

adam and the plastic

I met two members of adam and the plastic at a barbecue joint on Colonial. I was talking about another project that’s in the works, and they wanted to play it. That’s still happening (wait for it, I am excited) and this is happening too. Do you like your indie rock unshaven and sounding like something fresh from The Factory? Maybe you don’t even know what that means. Maybe you think I’m insane. Listen to this:

ZINES

Tittie-Thyme

Tittie-Thyme is an exceptional group of people. Their ideology is empowerment and community, a theme that engulfs every release. Emotive personal stories, interesting how-tos, and humorous anecdotes will leave you walking away having learned something (why do I sound like a kid from Reading Rainbow?). Women are their focus. But their audience is genderless.

Is It Over Yet?

A bunch of punks got together and made Is It Over Yet?. And it’s fucking beautiful. Their zines are filled with drawings and paintings and poetry and photographs and essays, all done with authenticity and feeling. Looking through IIOY?’s releases is like strolling through a back alley art gallery. What you find is probably going to be hard to look at, but it’s going to grab ahold of you and demand something immediately.

let’s kiss

let’s kiss is a zine orchestrated by our own KARINA CURTO! She compiled a bunch of first kiss/time stories from her friends, and they’re really good reads. These are packaged along with some personal photos and artwork. I love it because it’s so Karina.

SPOKEN WORD

Spoken word will be taking place before each band, and if we have enough people who want to read, after. I was sleeping on the Orlando spoken word circuit for a while, but my eyes are now open, and I can see.

If you want to read, send me an email: matt@thevinylwarhol.com 

Here’s an unfinished list of our spoken word boys and girls:

  • Karina Suzanne
  • Young Moon
  • Troy Cunio
  • Cory Young
  • Lila Miller 
  • Emily Beth
  • Matador

The Endearing Nature Sounds of Tiger Fawn

Deep in the forests of Downtown Orlando, a creature is stirring. Born out of the earth beneath its feet, this organism pays homage to its surroundings in the form of song. These musical moments seem to come directly from the earth itself. While listening, you feel the forest around you. The being I speak of is not one. It is three. It is Tiger Fawn. Enjoy.

Tiger Fawn full band

I was introduced to the forest folk three-piece Tiger Fawn at this year’s Sweater Fest. While sliding from stage to stage, my cohort and I were transfixed by Tiger Fawn frontwoman Dani Lacerda’s looped vocal melodies and wild, electric blue hair. Bassist Aimee Lindie stood atop an elevated platform with four added eyes painted on her face – a la Jack Sparrow meets Karen O. The other two members of Tiger Fawn had dawned similar tribal paint, and as one creative force, flowed through a set primitive, pop-tastic tunes.

Last week, Tiger Fawn released an EP of five songs titled The Fire Licks the Woods. The collection was finished before the additions of Lindie and drummer Russell Nylen, and therefore explores the personal creativity of Dani Lacerda. Woven throughout the EP are various nature sounds: chirping birds, falling rain, crackling fire, etc. The atmosphere created by these familiar noises is heightened by the soulful voice of Lacerda, who sits perched on a tree branch, sharing her story with the other creatures.

The Fire Licks the Woods however – although beautiful in an intimate manner – feels like a blueprint for something even greater. What I believe to be the true Tiger Fawn – or at least the one who caught my eye at Sweater Fest – is at this point best represented in the band’s live videos on the band’s YouTube Page. Here, their sound stands as the sonic being I described in the introduction. The unorthodox drumming are pounding footsteps; bass-lines evoke rolling thunder; vocal loops serve as the chatter of animals. Tiger Fawn not only recall the natural world, they create it.

If Tiger Fawn has convinced you, fantastic. These three are lighting up Lil Indies on 28th with Henry Toland, Phil Longo, and Kid Eternity. THIS IS FREE 21+ SHOW! Music starts at 9 P.M., and I’ve been promised that there will be face-paint, crazy dances, and jumping around.

Wet Nurse – “Belly Hurts” (Live @ The Space)

belly hurts

What makes your belly hurt? My belly hurts because I have Irritable Bowel Syndrome (yup). It seems the ladies of Wet Nurse also suffer from IBS, as their stomach pain erupts from a variety of sources. In my experience, I find rock n’ roll is the best medicine for a stomach ache.

That’s the exact cure I found two Saturdays ago at Polylust Burlesque’s Gender Bender Homecumming Fundraiser (that my friends, is called a segway). The night was bonkers. Great performances by Wet Nurse, The Areolas, Luscious Lisa, and the Polylust troop. This video is from said event and captures a currently unreleased, but I believe already recorded, song. They’re cookin’ up something, and I want to know about it. Experience more of the night at the holy David Wilcox’s YouTube Channel. Enjoy.

Also, you may notice a cameo appearance from both me and TVW’s OG Photographer, Karina. Cause we coo’.