Timothy Eerie Interview

‘A Dreidel Soaked in Acid’: Going to Space with Timothy Eerie

Sweater Fest 2015 is next Saturday! This year, the annual Christmas kerfuffle features a collection of talent where the only common thread between bands is the side effect of spastic dancing. One of those bands is psychedelic space pixies, Timothy Eerie. Dave Hanson (the Sweater Fest Santa himself!) spoke with the vocalist/guitarist Casey Lerman to see whether he’s been naughty or nice. The results: a dreidel soaked in acid. Enjoy.

For more info on all of the Sweater Fest happenings, check the FB event page, and read more interviews with the band’s at Happy Camper Booking.

How long has Timothy Eerie been a band?

We all starting putting our heads together this past summer, so Timothy Eerie has been a physical band for less than a year now. I came up with the idea to start writing these songs years ago. So in concept, Timothy Eerie has been in the making for some time.

How does the band change about show to show? I’ve only seen y’all twice but it was a different lineup both times.

This band is more of a collaborative art collective. We don’t have a solid lineup besides myself and my drummer, Mike Scitney. Everyone that plays with Timothy Eerie has other projects, so there are times that certain people will be booked on the days of our shows, and then we bring new characters into the picture. I like it. Each change-up brings a new flavor to the songs, so the set list goes through these reincarnations. It keeps it interesting for us and for the audience. 

Are you guys obsessed with LSD or was that just too good of a band name to pass up?

I wouldn’t call in an obsession, but it is an inspiration. I love it. The LSD state of mind is more real than anything in this external reality. It goes hand in hand with visionary art and music. Plus, it’s very therapeutic. I literally need to take it every so often to stay balanced. Going insane keeps me sane.

You guys have a keen focus on psychedelia — what defines this idea to you and at what point in creating a song do you feel like you have begun to achieve that? How does that idea play into your live performance versus your recordings?

Our music isn’t psychedelic in the traditional sense, but the songs are very influenced by  60’s and 70’s music and counterculture. That scene was fueled by the psychedelic experience, so it leaks into what we do. Our recordings are a little more straight forward than our live show. We go to space when we play live. Keeping it weird is something that we’re working on. And as time goes on, I believe our sound will find a more for a spiritual path rather than just psychedelia. 

Any of you guys have any weird christmas traditions?

My weirdest Christmas tradition is celebration Chanukah (*cue studio laugh).

What are you looking forward to most about Sweater Fest?

Honestly, I’m most excited to see the other bands do their thing. This will be our first time attending Sweater Fest, and the lineup is so tasty.

What’s in the works for Timothy Eerie?

We have so much in the works. We’re recording our EP right now. The working title is Heterochromia. We just got a band van and plan on taking her all around Florida in early February. We’re playing our first festival next year called Little Econ Love Fest at Maddox Ranch. Our art director, Sapphire Servellon aka Artardvark, is collaborating with a new projection mapping company, called Hybrid Eyes Visualizations, to bring some really weird visuals to the live shows. We’re releasing a visual art series called ‘Don’t think Broadcast’ early next year too. 

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SWEATER FEST 2015

SWEATER FEST 2015 (preview + playlist)

 “It’s the most wonderful time of the year.”
— Jesus (son of God)

SWEATER FEST 2014 was a landmark event. The night served as my introduction to incredible acts (and now, friends): Tiger Fawn, Someday River (at the time they were called Bellows), Fast Preacher, and ARK. On Saturday, December 19, I will again don my horrendous knitted outerwear and head to The Milk District for SWEATER FEST 2015. And this year’s lineup … oh yeah. Here’s a little taste test of the sweaty sweater goodness in-store, provided by your friends at Happy Camper Booking. Enjoy.

 If you’re at all familiar with this shitty website, you should recognize at least one of the bands on the bill. For some tight, feel-good grooves with a track record of dance hall boogie-woogie, check out Fat Night and Thrift House. When speaking of Fat Night’s 2015 EP, Lazy Days, TVW staff writer Graham Johnson had this to say:

The organ and guitar carry you throughout the album on waves of reverb and pure groove, inviting you to experience the graceful dance of the two instruments, performed by talented hands.

(Note: Fat Night are relocating to Chicago very soon, so this may be one of your last opportunities to see them kick ass, at least in the near future.)

I, myself, can vouch for Thrift House. This six-piece has only been playing live since September, but don’t be mistaken, Thrift House’s members are no spring chickens — this talent has spread itself all over Whorelando and beyond.

Maybe you consider yourself more of a rocker.”” Don’t fret little one; Daytona Beach doom woppers, Harum Scarum, and silly psych space aliens, Timothy Eerie, have the dance vitamins you crave, but with a really big muff (not what you think, but they probably don’t even use that pedal).

Rounding out this cozy, yet itchy, evening are SWIMM, Someday River, and Die Tryins. SWIMM, who jump back-and-forth between Orlando and Los Angeles, are indie poppy rocky sweetness, not unlike SWEATER FEST vets Someday River, who express the same sugary melodies, but with a cool funk. Die Tryins, on the other hand, are in a toe-tapping, indie bluegrass lane all their own. This band, formerly known as Goodrich & The Die Tryins, features Happy Camper’s Dave Hanson. He could have chosen to play with any of numerous bands he’s a part of, but he chose this one. That should convince you.

As if that wasn’t enough for your greedy commercialist ass, Frankasaurus Fresh will be hosting a silent disco on an outdoor stage. All of this for only $10. Doors are at 7, music starts at 8, and by 9, we may end the war against Christmas. Who knows?