1/20/14 Bag of Tracks: The Dead Weather, Chris Topher, U2

Good day all. I trust everyone’s MLK Day is going swell. I had a great weekend, even though I worked most of it. I saw the movie Her on Friday, and it was incredible. Now that we’re getting closer to Oscar night, I’ve been watching more and more movies. But, Her is by far my favorite of this award season. Everyone should go see it. I also made a trip over to the Dali Museum in St. Petersburg for the opening of their Andy Warhol exhibit. I was absolutely floored. If you live in Florida try to make it over there before it closes in April. Two of the greatest artists of the 20th century are brought together to showcase some breathtaking art.

On to today’s blog! It’s been a while sense we’ve had “A Bag of Tracks,” and we’ve got some good ones for you. Enjoy.

The Dead Weather – “Open Up (That’s Enough)”

The Dead Weather come screaming back with “Open Up (That’s Enough),” their first new material since 2010’s Sea of Cowards. This track is the most furious Dead Weather song since “Treat Me Like Your Mother”. Allison Mosshart takes the reins on vocal duties, with Jack, Little Jack, and Dean singing backup. During the chorus the three men struggle to contain Mosshart, warning her, “That’s enough, that’s enough.” But, she keeps pushing forward into a flurry of rock. The group have plans to release a full-length in 2015, and will be putting out several singles from the album this year. You can listen to “Rough Detective,” the second song released, on Spotify.

Chris Topher – “Creators & Innovators”

For those who don’t remember, I reviewed Chris’ EP Introspective a few months back and was blown away by the sonic bliss. Shortly after I reviewed the EP, I talked to Chris about how much I loved his music and what he planned to do with it in the future. He initially said that Introspective was going to be his last release, but after how well it was received, he was inspired to continue creating. That brings us to “Creators & Innovators”. The microphone crackles as Chris begins with a warped synth line. Like the rest of his music, I’m instantly transported to another world. I get lost in the continuous drum beat that is both big and beautiful. The whole song is intergalactic in size and feel. As the music closes, an old radio sample, which has become a staple for Chris, follows us out with a thought provoking monologue. Goosebumps.

U2 – “Pride (In The Name Of Love)”

Obviously, this song was written back in the 80’s, but today it has extra meaning. For those who are unaware, this song is about Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. I think “Pride (In The Name Of Love)” captures the humble preacher’s character perfectly. His struggle. His persistence. His message. As Bono so beautifully puts it, “Free at last, they took your life. They could not take your pride.” Even if you hate U2, I hope today you can feel something marvelous. Have a wonderful day.

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Vinyl Junkie: Third Man reissues Paramount

It’s a good day for vinyl lovers. Like everything else that comes out of Jack White’s Third Man Records, their latest project is genius on wax. Today I’m talking about, “The Rise and Fall of Paramount Records 1917-1932”, a two-volume set of songs that would otherwise have been forgotten. Enjoy.

Be sure to follow The Vinyl Warhol on Facebook and Twitter for more music updates.

Jack White: The Musical Historian

Jack White is a man of many faces. Songwriter. Singer. Guitar God. Drummer. Pianist. Record label head. And now he’s helping preserve Paramount Record’s musical history, with the help of the good folks down at Third Man Records. If you’re not familiar with Paramount, they were founded in 1917, and released musics from legends such as: Louis Armstrong, Charley Patton, Son House, Alberta Hunter, and Papa Charlie Jackson. “Paramount Records was founded on a modest proposition: produce records as cheaply as possible, recording whatever talent was available. ” It’s plain to see, that Paramount’s vision is more alive today than ever, it strives in independent record labels all over the country. Third Man is no exception, and their hope is that by making this music easily available to the public, they can preserve it.

Volume one of “The Rise and Fall of Paramount Records” is set to be released on November 19.

The set includes:

  • 800 newly-remastered digital tracks, representing 172 artists
  • 200+ fully-restored original 1920s ads and images
  • 6x 180g vinyl LPs pressed on burled chestnut colored vinyl w/ hand-engraved, blind-embossed gold-leaf labels, housed in a laser-etched white birch LP folio
  • 250 page deluxe large-format clothbound hardcover art book
  • 360 page encyclopedia-style softcover field guide containing artist portraits and full Paramount discography
  • Handcrafted quarter-sawn oak cabinet with lush sage velvet upholstery and custom-forged metal hardware
  • First-of-its-kind music and image player app, allowing user mgmt of all tracks and ads, housed on custom-designed USB drive

I am so excited for this release, Third Man Records is breaking new ground everyday, and is helping keep music and vinyl alive.

Find out more about the release at Third Man Records.